July 10, 2018

Microbial Invaders of our Environment ~ A Nobel Laureate's Perspective

Microbial Invaders of our Environment ~ A Nobel Laureate's Perspective

By: Anne Zinn

 
On Monday, July 9, The Non-Ruminant Nutrition Symposium at the ASAS-CSAS Annual Meeting began with a stimulating presentation by Nobel Prize Laureate Luc Montagnier, a French virologist credited with the co-discovery of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Montagnier discussed microbial interactions with the environment and how new, refined technologies can detect the changes in the microbial environment. He then outlined the role of water in DNA detection by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and his theory of DNA transduction, which has sparked controversy in the scientific community. Montagnier’s theory claims that DNA produce measurable electromagnetic signals that can be measurable when diluted in water. That signal can then be recorded, transmitted electronically, and re-emitted on another pure water sample, allowing DNA to replicate through PCR despite the absence of the original DNA. Montagnier went on to discuss two research projects he led concerning bacterial and viral DNA that supported the theory of DNA transduction. This research is new and promising, but also controversial and has sparked a multitude of conversations among the community; more research is needed at this time. 
 
To conclude his presentation, Montagnier stressed the importance of valuing health over economy. There have been major changes to the environment, including chemical pollution and climate change, that are a result of economic-oriented thinking and decision-making that have had negative effects on overall health, such as immune deficiency, reproduction, chronic diseases, and rising epidemics. Montagnier emphasized that health must prevail over economy, otherwise, human and animal health will continue to decline.