July 11, 2018

Cell Biology Symposium: Metabolic responses to stress: From the animal to the cell

Cell Biology Symposium: Metabolic responses to stress: From the animal to the cell
By: Anne Zinn

 

The Cell Biology Symposium at the ASAS-CSAS Annual Meeting on Monday, July 9 invited speakers to discuss metabolic responses to stress in the cell to the whole animal. Topics included the reconsideration of metabolic decompensation in mitochondrial hepatopathy (Peter McGuire, Investigator, National Human Genome Research Institute), oxidative stress and efficiency in mitochondria in health and disease (Walter Bottje, Professor, University of Arkansas), and the cellular mechanisms linking metabolic stress with emotional disease in cattle (Martin Sheldon, Professor, Swansea University). In particular, Kristen Govoni, Associate Professor at the University of Connecticut, presented on the effects of poor maternal nutrition during gestation on the offspring in sheep. It is known that poor maternal nutrition, specifically under- and over-feeding, during gestation can negatively affect fetal and postnatal growth and metabolism, including reduced muscle development, increased adipogenesis, altered mesenchymal stem cell and satellite cell function, and metabolic dysregulation in offspring. Dr. Govoni, in collaboration with Dr. Sarah Reed (University of Connecticut) and Dr. Steven Zinn (University of Connecticut), conducted multiple projects over the past seven years to evaluate these negative effects and demonstrated altered glucose metabolism, insulin sensitivity, and leptin resistance. In addition, the research team has reported mitochondrial metabolism is altered in offspring mesenchymal stem cells and that muscle metabolites are altered in response to both under- and over-feeding of ewes during gestation. More research is required to determine the mechanisms contributing to these systematic change; this will lead to a more comprehensive understanding of the effects of maternal programming and identification of improved methods for managing offspring and increasing efficiency of production.