October 22, 2020

Interpretive Summary: Feeding weaned pigs multi-enzyme supplemented diets

Interpretive Summary: Growth performance, nutrient digestibility, and fecal microbial composition of weaned pigs fed multi-enzyme supplemented diets

By Anne Zinn

Cereal grains contain phytate and nonstarch polysaccharides that reduce nutrient digestibility in pigs, which can cause inflammatory responses, specifically within weaned pigs. The effects of supplementing cereal grain-based diets for weaned pigs with enzyme products that contain one or various combinations of the nonstarch polysaccharides-degrading enzymes on nutrient utilization have been studied in detail, but there is limited information on the effects of adding a combination of nonstarch polysaccharides-degrading enzymes, protease, and different sources of amylases to phytase-supplemented diets.

A study recently published in the Journal of Animal Science aimed to determine the effects of adding 2 multi-enzyme products, and 1 of 2 novel amylase products to phytase-supplemented corn–soybean meal-based diets for weaned pigs on growth performance, apparent total tract digestibility of energy and nutrients, fecal score, and fecal bacterial composition. The research team hypothesized that the addition of enzyme products containing nonstarch polysaccharides-degrading enzymes, protease, and amylase to phytase-supplemented diets for weaned pigs would improve growth performance, gut health, and nutrient digestibility and that the magnitude of improvement in growth performance, gut health, and nutrient digestibility would vary depending on the sources of the enzymes in the enzyme products.

Results of the study demonstrated that the addition of a multi-enzyme complex to a phytase-supplemented corn–soybean meal-based diet for weaned pigs improved their growth performance and apparent total tract digestibility of fat. However, multi-enzyme did not affect the apparent total tract digestibility of gross energy, which suggests that the multi-enzyme complex improved growth performance through mechanisms other than improvement in apparent total tract digestibility of gross energy. The results suggest that the multi-enzyme products used in the study may be added to a phytase-supplemented corn–soybean meal-based diet for weaned pigs to improve growth performance, but that the multi-enzyme B product may be slightly more effective in improving growth performance and reducing diarrhea of weaned pigs than multi-enzyme product A.

A full description of  multi-enzyme A or B diets fed, along with extended results and discussion, can be found in the full paper on the Journal of Animal Science website.