Featured Articles

  • Dec
    04
    Why Come to Austin?


    annual 2019
    Get a quick look at what Austin, TX has to offer durning the 2019 ASAS-CSAS Annual Meeting.

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  • Dec
    04
    President's Corner


    A brief message from the CSAS President Dr. Ibeagha-Awemu.

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  • Jun
    29
    New additions to 2017-2018 Executive Committee


    CSAS_Logo
    Meet the new talented people who have accepted to serve on the 2017-2018 CSAS Executive Committee:

    Eastern Director: Dr. Anna Kate Shoveller (Assistant Professor, University of Guelph)


    Anna Kate Shoveller grew up on a hobby farm where she eagerly raised horses, pigs, chickens, goats, sheep, rabbits and a host of cats and dogs. It is no surprise that she translated her love of animals into a desire to learn as much as possible about them. Her personal mission is to conduct research that will help improve the lives of cats and dogs, while also teaching and mentoring the next generation of companion animal scientists and pet product experts. Shoveller received her BSc, Honours in Animal Biology from the University of Guelph in 1997 and her PhD in Nutrition and Metabolism from the University of Alberta in 2004. Her PhD thesis was focused on sulfur amino acid metabolism in baby piglets and the role of the gut.

    In 2009, Shoveller was selected by the American Society for Nutrition to receive the Peter J. Reeds Memorial Young Investigator Award, which recognized her contributions to the understanding of neonatal sulfur amino acid metabolism and specifically for the changes that have been made in the parenteral feeding industry due to the knowledge developed in her PhD. Shoveller served as the provincial equine nutritionist for Alberta Agriculture, Food and Rural Development (2003-2004) prior to joining the University of Guelph as a post-doctoral fellow in companion animal nutrition (2004-2007). Her post doctoral research developed and validated a minimally invasive technique to measure amino acid requirements in dogs and will provide the basis for better understanding the variables that affect amino acid requirements in dogs.


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  • Jun
    29
    Take in these symposia at Annual Meeting


    Two CSAS symposia will be taking place at the 2017 ASAS-CSAS Annual Meeting & Trade Show 8-12, July, in Baltimore, Maryland.

    Title: From one to all biological components – the new approach of Systems Biology

    Date and Time: Sunday July 9th, 2:00 – 5:00 pm.

    See the speaker list!


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  • Jun
    28
    CSAS events at Annual Meeting




    You are all cordially invited to attend the Annual General Meeting (AGM) where important issues affecting us as a society will be discussed and decisions taken.

    A reminder that the CSAS Awards Banquet is on Monday, July 10, beginning at 6:00 p.m. During the banquet we will recognize and celebrate outstanding professional and student members of our society. You are all invited to join in the celebration of great achievements. Come and cheer your colleagues on! This activity will be followed by the Members Mixer, an occasion where ideas flow freely and where partnerships are forged. This is a must attend event. Remember to attend and encourage our students during the student poster and oral competitions.

    Here are details on activities and times:


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  • Jun
    28
    Student events at Annual Meeting


    Students: Here are some events for you at the 2017 ASAS-CSAS Annual Meeting & Trade Show. The meeting is coming up 8-12 July in Baltimore, Maryland!

    Sunday, 9 July:  CSAS Graduate Student Poster Competition

    Sunday, 9 July: CSAS Graduate Student Oral Competition

    View information about CSAS symposia taking place at the Annual Meeting.


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  • Jun
    28
    Read latest issue of CJAS online


    The latest issue of the Canadian Journal of Animal Science (June 2017, Volume 97, Number 2) is now online!

    Access the Table of Contents.

    Access Just-IN articles.

    See e-First articles.


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  • Apr
    07
    Call for nominations for CSAS 2017 awards


    Nominations are now being accepted for Canadian Society of Animal Science 2017 Awards, to be presented at the 2017 ASAS-CSAS Annual Meeting & Trade Show in Baltimore, MD, USA, from July 8-12, 2017. The deadline is midnight, on Friday, April 28, 2017.

    Please nominate your deserving colleagues for the following awards:

    Awarded to CSAS members for truly outstanding contributions in any field of animal agriculture. Selection is to be made by the Honors and Awards Committee from nominations by the membership. This award is sponsored by Alltech Canada Inc.

    Awarded to CSAS members to encourage excellence in teaching, research or extension in the fields of nutrition and meat science at the provincial, federal or international level.


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  • Mar
    29
    Latest CJAS online


    The March 2017 issue (Volume 97, Number 1) of the Canadian Journal of Animal Science is now online.

    Access the March Table of Contents.

    Access Just-IN articles.

    See e-First articles.


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  • Mar
    29
    Calling all students!


    The Canadian Society of Animal Science (CSAS) is a national non-profit organization of persons engaged in extension, production, research, teaching or with a related interest in Livestock or Poultry Industries in Canada.

    CSAS – A Great Forum for Students!

     

    For more information please visit https://asas.org/csas


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  • Mar
    29
    Membership news


    In case you haven’t renewed your CSAS membership, this is a friendly reminder to do so as soon as possible. The great news is that renewing your annual membership is a simple click away.  Click here to renew now for the 2017 calendar year. 

    Don’t miss out on the opportunities for your students – only members are eligible for CSAS awards, so don’t forget to encourage your students to join – student membership fees are only $15!

    Your 2016 fees were hard at work! 

    Here’s a quick recap of some of the great initiatives your 2016 membership fees helped produce:


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  • Mar
    29
    Call for Nominations for CSAS vacant Executive Positions


    sheep
    Call for Nominations for CSAS vacant Executive Positions

    NOMINATIONS ARE DUE BY April 7, 2017.

    The CSAS is requesting nominations to fill the following positions on the 2017-18 Executive Committee:

    Please refer to www.csas.net for details on positions as well as responsibilities.


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  • Mar
    29
    Forage Agronomy position available


    Post-Doctoral Research Fellowship Position – Forage Agronomy

    The Western Beef Development Centre (WBDC) is seeking a Post-Doctoral Researcher in the discipline of Forage Agronomy for a three-year term (2017 to 2020).

    Job Description: Under the supervision of a senior PhD research scientist, this researcher will develop and conduct research in topics relevant to the Western Canadian cow/calf industry to improve forage production in grazing and preserved forage systems, improve forage quality and livestock productivity and ensuring the social, economic, and environmental sustainability of forage/livestock systems.

    The candidate will be required to develop applicable collaborative research grants based on the industry needs and latest applicable research, to develop research protocols, manage projects, conduct field experiments, collect and analyze scientific data, interpret and communicate results to a diverse audience, as well as scientific and technical writing, publishing and presentation to the public.


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  • Mar
    29
    In memory of Philip A. Thacker


    Philip A. Thacker,

    Ph.D. University of Saskatchewan

    Phil Thacker was born in Vancouver and received both his B.Sc. and M.Sc. degrees in Animal Science from the University of British Columbia. His Ph.D. (1982) was from the University of Alberta on research entitled “The effects of dietary propionate on lipid metabolism in growing swine”.

    He was a Regional Swine Specialist for Alberta Agriculture before joining the University of Saskatchewan as an Assistant Professor in 1984 in the Department of Animal and Poultry Science. Phil was a full professor by 1991. Phil’s main research areas focused on swine nutrition and reproductive management with the ultimate goal of improving industry practice.


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  • Feb
    15
    Upcoming Events


    March 21-22nd 2017, Leduc, Alberta.

    For more information on this event please click here.

    March 28th, BCRC webinar.

    For more information please click here.


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  • Feb
    15
    TB outbreak - Light at the end of the tunnel for cattle producers in Alberta and Saskatchewan


    Penny Young, ASAS/ASAP Intern

    The bovine tuberculosis (TB) outbreak traced to Jenner, Alberta late last year that set off a massive investigation involving over 60 farming operations finally has an end in sight. The investigation, overseen by the Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA), has found no affected animals aside from the six identified in the index herd.

    Using trace-back and trace-forward approaches, the CFIA identified and subsequently quarantined around 58 operations across Alberta and Saskatchewan. Testing of animals on these properties resulted in the selection of 18 properties for culling and testing procedures due to the presence of positive responders to the tuberculin test. These procedures resulted in the loss of around 10,000 mature cattle and most calves of the 18 farming operations, however it was found that no animals presented with tuberculosis in the enhanced post-mortem testing. In addition to routine searches for characteristic tuberculosis lesions, this testing included examination of tissue under microscope (looking to detect presence of Mycobacterium bovis), PCR, and tissue culture.

    What’s next?


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  • Feb
    15
    CSAS symposia at 2017 Annual Meeting


    We are excited to announce that we will be holding two CSAS symposia at the 2017 ASAS-CSAS Annual Meeting in Baltimore in July.

    Title: From one to all biological components – the new approach of Systems Biology

    Date and Time: Sunday July 9th, 2:00 – 5:00 pm.

    Speakers:


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  • Feb
    15
    Warm Pacific water linked to seabird deaths


    Written by Ashlee McEvoy ASAS/ASAP Intern

    Early 2016, tens of thousands of common murres washed up starved on beaches from California to Alaska. The cause of this death has now been linked to unusually warm water temperatures that had affected the fish they fed upon.

    Volunteers and researchers counted carcasses of 46000 dead murres in Alaska, with another 6000 being found in California, Oregon and Washington. CTV News interviewed John Piatt, a research wildlife biologist in the U.S. Geological Survey. Piatt states that this was only a fraction of the dead birds that would have met the shore. And only fractions of the Alaskan coastline was surveyed, this causes a conservative extrapolation to indicate that more than 500000 common murres died in this time.

    “They died of starvation because there was no food. There was no food because there was no fish. And there was no fish because these warm waters did something to them,” Piatt states.


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  • Feb
    15
    Newer respiratory pathogens prove hard to spot


    Penny Young, ASAS/ASAP Intern

    An article by Roy Lewis posted late last year on Grainews identified two lesser known pathogens that are emerging as causes of respiratory disease in cattle. The article also highlights how management practices are important in helping to minimize the impact of these diseases, given there is little specific prophylaxis or treatment available.

    One of the agents identified was a Coronavirus, a virus family most commonly associated with scouring in new calves and winter dysentery in mature cattle. However, the virus can also cause respiratory disease. While this respiratory disease is typically milder or subclinical, it poses threats to calves’ health as it can infect the respiratory epithelium, which can increase susceptibility to secondary bacterial infection. It also poses a problem because large amounts of the virus are secreted in the nasal mucus, allowing the disease to be easily spread to other cattle, especially amongst housed animals.

    While vaccines containing coronavirus exist for scours, no respiratory vaccines containing the virus are currently on the market. Hence to prevent disease, it is vital that the immune systems of the calves are kept in top form as immunocompromise due to vitamin/mineral deficiency, stress or parasites may increase the risk of coronavirus respiratory infection. This is especially important to consider when bringing many susceptible animals together, such as newly weaned calves moving to a feedlot. This kind of non-specific protection through improving immunity is crucial given there is no specific defense or treatment offered. Rigorous vaccination programs for other respiratory diseases is also important as Coronavirus is commonly seen in association with the other, more prominent, respiratory viruses and bacteria.


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  • Feb
    15
    Open sow system push


    Written by Ashlee McEvoy ASAS/ASAP Intern

    The gestation stall was introduced in the 1970’s. The stall was used to prevent sows fighting amongst themselves and allow sows to receive individual care. Because of this, more live piglets were produced than what had been previously.

    However today, the views on animal welfare have changed dramatically, forcing hog producers to change with them. Due to the demands of consumers and the push of animal welfare, the Canadian Code of Practice for the care and handling of pigs (2014), now require that as of the 1st of July, 2014, all new buildings and renovations must accommodate sows in group housing during gestation. It was also stated that existing buildings that do not undergo renovation may continue with stall operation, but must provide additional requirements for providing greater freedom as of July 1, 2024. More information on the Code of Practice can be found here.

    Tom Parsons was a hog farmer before becoming a veterinarian and a professor in swine medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. Parsons mentioned in an interview with The Western Producer after giving a talk at the Banff Pork Seminar in January that the drive to stop using gestation stalls was promoted by people with animal welfare on their minds.


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