Featured Articles

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    Aug
    15
    Marques awarded Joseph P. Fontenot Scholarship


    By Jamie Hawley, ASAS Communications Intern

    August 15, 2016 – Mr. Rodrigo da Silva Marques was named the recipient of the 2016 Joseph P. Fontenot Appreciation Club Travel Scholarship by the American Society of Animal Science (ASAS) during its annual meeting in Salt Lake City, Utah. Marques also was named a 2016 Young Scholar by the Western Section ASAS (WSASAS). Read more about his award in this press release.

    Mr. Marques is originally from Brazil where he received a B.S. in Animal Sciences from Sao Paulo State University (Unesp-Dracena). After graduating, he worked as a manager of a beef cattle feedlot facility for 2 years. In 2009, Mr. Marques started a M.S. program in Animal Science at University of Sao Paulo- Esalq under supervision of Dr. Flavio Augusto Portela Santos, with his research focusing on feedlot nutritional management to beef cattle. Mr. Marques graduated in July 2011, and immediately moved to Oregon to start a research intern program under Dr. Reinaldo Cooke’s supervision. In 2013, he started a Ph.D. program at Oregon State University with Dr. Cooke, focusing on maternal nutrition of beef cattle and its effects on the offspring performance.

    Mr. Marques has already authored and co-authored 18 published articles, as well as 2 book chapters, 9 proceedings papers, 20 professional meeting abstracts, 9 research reports, and 7 popular press articles. In 2014, he received the 1st and 2nd place Applied Animal Research Awards at the Western Section American Society of Animal Science Scientific Meeting. Moreover, in 2015, he received another 2nd place finish. Upon graduation, Mr. Marques’ ultimate goal is to work as a professor/research scientist, and apply the knowledge obtained throughout his education career to develop technologies that enhance beef production system.


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    Aug
    15
    Marques awarded WSASAS Young Scholar Award


    By Jamie Hawley, ASAS Communications Intern

    August 15, 2016 – Mr. Rodrigo da Silva Marques has been named the recipient of the 2016 Young Scholar Award – Ph.D. by the Western Section, American Society of Animal Science (WSASAS) during its annual meeting in Salt Lake City, Utah. Marques also is the recipient of a 2016 Joseph P. Fontenot Appreciation Club Travel Scholarship. Read more about his travel scholarship in this press release.

    Mr. Marques is originally from Brazil where he received a B.S. in Animal Sciences from Sao Paulo State University (Unesp-Dracena). After graduating, he worked as a manager of a beef cattle feedlot facility for 2 years. In 2009, Mr. Marques started a M.S. program in Animal Science at University of Sao Paulo- Esalq under supervision of Dr. Flavio Augusto Portela Santos, with his research focusing on feedlot nutritional management to beef cattle. Mr. Marques graduated in July 2011, and immediately moved to Oregon to start a research intern program under Dr. Reinaldo Cooke’s supervision. In 2013, he started a Ph.D. program at Oregon State University with Dr. Cooke, focusing on maternal nutrition of beef cattle and its effects on the offspring performance.

    Mr. Marques has already authored and co-authored 18 published articles, as well as 2 book chapters, 9 proceedings papers, 20 professional meeting abstracts, 9 research reports, and 7 popular press articles. In 2014, he received the 1st and 2nd place Applied Animal Research Awards at the Western Section American Society of Animal Science Scientific Meeting. Moreover, in 2015, he received another 2nd place finish. Upon graduation, Mr. Marques’ ultimate goal is to work as a professor/research scientist, and apply the knowledge obtained throughout his education career to develop technologies that enhance beef production system.


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    Aug
    09
    ASAS approves Australian society as first international section


    August 2016 – The American Society of Animal Science (ASAS) Board of Directors has approved the Australian Society of Animal Production (ASAP) as the first international section of ASAS. The decision comes on the heels of a recent ASAS membership vote, which allows the ASAS Board to extend membership to international sections.

    Specifically, the ASAS membership voted in favor of changes to the ASAS Constitution and Bylaws that allow non-U.S. sections to join the ASAS membership. Final results were tabulated following in-person voting at the 2016 ASAS Annual Business Meeting, held in Salt Lake City on July 22, 2016.

    The ASAS Board of Directors’ decision is in keeping with a key objective of the current ASAS Strategic Plan, which seeks to expand and diversify the membership by actively recruiting members from outside the United States.

    In 2016, ASAS achieved an all-time high membership of 6,000 members. This total membership includes 3,000 Professional Members. Approximately 30 percent of these professional members are from countries outside the United States. In contrast, international professional members made up 10% of the ASAS professional membership in 2006.


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    Aug
    08
    ASAS Constitution and Bylaws changes


    August 10, 2016 – Results of a membership vote on changes to the ASAS Constitution and ASAS Bylaws are now available. Final results, which pave the way for non-U.S. sections to join the membership, were tabulated at the annual business meeting in July. Here is a breakdown of the results.

    Vote 1: Change to the ASAS Constitution

    This passed with 84% voting in favor of the change.

     


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    Aug
    08
    Garrick awarded Bouffault International Animal Agriculture Award


    By Jamie Hawley, ASAS Communications Intern

    August 10, 2016 – Dr. Dorian Garrick was named the recipient of the 2016 American Society of Animal Science (ASAS) Bouffault International Animal Agriculture Award by the ASAS during its annual meeting in Salt Lake City, Utah.

    Dr. Garrick has held the Lush Chair in Animal Breeding & Genetics at Iowa State University since 2007, after 5 years at Colorado State University and 15 years at Massey University in New Zealand. He has a First Class Honors degree from Massey University and a Ph.D. from Cornell University.

    Dr. Garrick has trained graduate students and postdoctoral fellows from 14 developing countries. He has been integrally involved in research, development, and implementation of a variety of genetic improvement programs in livestock and plants in developed and developing countries. He is the Executive Director of the U.S. National Beef Cattle Evaluation Consortium. His recent work focuses on the theory and application of genomics in animal improvement. He enjoys working with enthusiastic producer and industry groups from developed and developing countries that seek to include animal breeding approaches in the attainment of their business goals. Dr. Garrick will be returning to Massey University in January 2017.


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    Aug
    08
    Donkin awarded Animal Growth and Development Award


    By Jamie Hawley, ASAS Communications Intern

    August 10, 2016 – Dr. Shawn S. Donkin was named the recipient of the 2016 American Society of Animal Science (ASAS) Animal Growth and Development Award by the ASAS during its annual meeting in Salt Lake City, Utah.

    Dr. Donkin received a B.S. from McGill University (1982), M.S. in Dairy and Animal Science from The Pennsylvania State University (1987), and Ph.D. in Dairy Science from the University of Wisconsin-Madison (1992). He has been a member of the faculty of Purdue University since 1995. Dr. Donkin has developed an internationally-recognized research program that examines hepatic function to support food animal production, animal well-being, and human health. This research has expanded the knowledge base for the biology of nutrient metabolism in mammalian liver during health and disease.

    Dr. Donkin’s laboratory was among the first to describe the molecular events that control glucose metabolism in ruminants and the role of gene promoter responses to hormones and nutrients in this regard. Dr. Donkin’s research program at Purdue University has been supported by the U.S. Department of Agriculture-Agriculture and Food Research Initiative, the National Institutes of Health, commodity groups, private industry, state programs, and private foundations.


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    Aug
    08
    ASAS attends Brazilian Society of Animal Science Annual Meeting


    By Dr. Deb Hamernik, President, ASAS

    August 10, 2016 – One of my first official duties as President of ASAS since leaving the JAM (Joint Annual Meeting) and ISAG (International Society for Animal Genetics) meetings in Salt Lake City, UT was to represent ASAS at the 53rd Annual Meeting of the Brazilian Society of Animal Science (aka Sociedade Brasileira de Zootecnia or SBZ) in Gramado, Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil on July 31 – August 4. SBZ was founded on July 26, 1951 and currently has more than 3,000 members from Brazil and around the world. The society has published the Brazilian Journal of Animal Science since 1973.

    More than 700 people attended the SBZ meeting in Gramado this year. The program included 76 lectures, 36 oral papers, and more than 700 posters. The theme of this meeting was “Animal Production for Future Generations” and there were many undergraduate and graduate students in attendance.

    There were also several presentations on sustainable livestock systems in Brazil, Argentina, and Uruguay. One of the underlying themes from these presentations was the passion from scientists and livestock producers for beef cattle production, improving animal welfare, and protecting the environment. Dr. Valeria Pacheco Euclides (EMBRAPA) presented a visionary description of the Role of Brazilian Livestock Production in Feeding Future Generations. Since 1950, Brazilian beef producers have been responsible for a 79% increase in beef productivity and significant improvements in pasture quality, including increases in soil organic carbon. Without these increases in efficiencies, Brazil would need an extra 525 million hectares of pasture to produce the same amount of beef that is produced today. Dr. Euclides predicts that future livestock production systems will require more intensive knowledge and new technologies, including highly qualified personnel, the ability to mitigate and adapt to climate change, and precision management practices that will take advantage of local or regional characteristics to optimize efficient production of beef with fewer inputs and fewer natural resources.


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    Aug
    02
    Obituary of Dr. C.F.M. (Kees) de Lange, 55


    August 4, 2016 – After an eight year battle with melanoma, Dr. C. F. M. (Kees) de Lange, Professor at the University of Guelph, passed away in his home surrounded by his loving family on August 1, 2016. He was 55.

    Dr. de Lange is remembered as a beloved husband and father as well as an innovative swine nutrition researcher, effective teacher, and respected consultant. He was an avid outdoorsman and enjoyed hours spent with his family and friends cycling, canoeing, hiking and camping in the Canadian outdoors and trips abroad.

    Dr. de Lange received his B.S. and M.S. degrees in Animal Science from the Agricultural University in Wageningen, the Netherlands, and his Ph.D. in Swine Nutrition from the University of Alberta. Dr. de Lange was a professor in the Department of Animal and Poultry Science at the University of Guelph since 1994, and served as pork research coordinator from 2002 to 2009. Prior to his appointment at the University of Guelph, Dr. de Lange had a distinguished career in the Ontario feed industry and applied research at the Prairie Swine Centre in Saskatchewan.

    Dr. de Lange’s swine nutrition research was focused on feed ingredient evaluation systems, liquid feeding, means to increase the nutritional value of feed ingredients, the characterization of pig genotype and environmental effects on nutrient utilization in growing pigs, and mathematical modeling of financial and environmental impact of alternative management strategies for growing-finishing pigs. He had research collaborations with colleagues at the University of Guelph, Agriculture and AgriFood Canada, Murdoch University, Massey University, Michigan State University, Iowa State University, Texas Tech University and South Dakota State University.


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    Aug
    02
    Obituary of Dr. Thomas Sutherland, 85




    August 4, 2016 – Dr. Thomas Sutherland, Professor Emeritus at Colorado State University, passed away in his Fort Collins, CO home on July 22, 2016 at the age of 85.

    Dr. Sutherland is remembered as a man of many talents, good humor, and incredible generosity. In addition to his role as a professor, Dr. Sutherland was also a supporter of the arts, one-time actor, co-author of a book, and freed hostage in Beirut.

    Dr. Sutherland received a B.S. in Agriculture degree from the University of Glasglow in Scotland. He achieved his M.S. and Ph.D. in Animal Breeding from Iowa State University. From there he joined the faculty at Colorado State University (CSU) teaching animal science. Dr. Sutherland accepted a position as Dean of the Faculty of Agriculture and Food Science at the American University in Beirut in 1983. Two years later, he was kidnapped by the Islamic Jihadists and was held hostage until his release in 1991. Dr. Sutherland returned to Fort Collins after his release to much celebration. Dr. Sutherland was given the title Professor Emeritus by Colorado State University upon his return.


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    Aug
    02
    Companion Animal Symposium summary




    By: Lucy Schroeder, ASAS Communications Intern

    August 4, 2016 – Over 7 million dogs and cats in the United States are relinquished to shelters every year. Many owners cite poor behavior as a reason for relinquishing their pet, however many issues are fixable by training and education. The speakers at the Joint Annual Meeting Companion Animal Symposium: Behavior and the Human-Animal Bond seek to reduce the number of pets relinquished to shelters through developing a deeper understanding of the animals’ behavior and psychology. The speaker line up included Dr. Bill Milgram (CanCog Technologies), Dr. Ragen McGowan (Nestle Purina Research), Dr. Candace Croney (Purdue University), and Dr. Cheryl Morris (Iowa State University).

    Dr. Milgram’s research is focused on assessing the cognitive abilities of companion animals—specifically dogs. He and his team developed a set of tests to study the different domains of cognition in dogs. They devised a test for object discrimination, in which one of two objects are associated with reward, reversal learning in which the reward object was changed, an egocentric learning task, in which the dogs had to locate the object with reward in relation to its relative position to their body, and a working memory task in which the dogs had to remember the location of an object initially presented to them, then respond to it in a new position after a delay. Dr. Milgram’s team found that older dogs made more errors than younger dogs.


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    Aug
    02
    Loy awarded Animal Industry Service Award


    By Jamie Hawley, ASAS Communications Intern

    August 4, 2016 – Dr. Dan D. Loy was named the recipient of the 2016 American Society of Animal Science (ASAS) Animal Industry Service Award by the ASAS during its annual meeting in Salt Lake City, Utah.

    Dr. Loy is Professor and Extension Beef Specialist at Iowa State University.  Thousands of beef producers have benefited from his advice and research-based information over his 30+ year career. He helped introduce the microcomputer to daily decision-making, resulting in better cost and performance benchmarking and improved efficiency for feedlots.  He was part of the team that developed the Beef Ration and Nutrition Decisions Software (BRANDS) nutrition program to better apply complex nutritional models in practical diet formulation. He led a multi-faceted applied research and education approach to the increased acceptance of co-products of the ethanol industry.

    Dr. Loy currently leads the extension effort of a multi-state project on feed efficiency in beef cattle. As director of the Iowa Beef Center he leads a team that serves as an information resource for the beef industry. His commitment to extension, teaching, and applied research has helped producers leverage technology to improve the efficiency of beef production.


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    Aug
    02
    Hill awarded ASAS Fellow: Teaching Category


    By Jamie Hawley, ASAS Communications Intern

    August 4, 2016 – Dr. Gretchen Myers Hill was named a recipient of the 2016 American Society of Animal Science (ASAS) Fellow Award: Teaching Category by the ASAS during its annual meeting this week in Salt Lake City, Utah.

    Dr. Hill earned degrees from the University of Kentucky, Purdue University, and Michigan State University (MSU).  She was on the faculty at the University of Michigan and the University of Missouri before returning to MSU. She is known as “the professor who never gives up on students.” At MSU, she introduced group learning, developed case studies, wrote on-line texts for students in animal science and writing, and utilized clicker technology.

    Under Dr. Hill’s supervision, undergraduate students have conducted research studies and presented their findings in ASAS competition. She follows students’ careers and stays in contact with them. Dr. Hill has served as advisor to the Block and Bridle Club, and departmental, college, and university curriculum committees.


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    Aug
    02
    McNamara awarded ASAS Fellow: Teaching Category


    By Jamie Hawley, ASAS Communications Intern

    August 4, 2016 – Dr. John P. McNamara was named a recipient of the 2016 American Society of Animal Science (ASAS) Fellow Award: Teaching Category by the ASAS during its annual meeting this week in Salt Lake City, Utah.

    Dr. McNamara has been training animal scientists for more than 30 years. He has challenged and inspired students to relate classroom learning to knowledge for career success and societal benefit. His teaching extends from classroom, to research lab, farms, and animal shelters. Early on, he initiated courses in companion animal nutrition and management, which have been emulated nationally. He authored a companion animal textbook that helped start several classes and is widely used. His work with the Washington Science Teachers Association has brought accuracy of animal biology and animal production content to K-12 curricula exposing a wide population to the science of animals and agriculture.

    In 2007, Dr. McNamara was awarded the ASAS Corbin Companion Animal Biology Award and has been an active member of ASAS for more than 30 years. In 2012 he was elected Fellow of the American Dairy Science Association (ADSA) and is one of the very few to be named a Fellow of both ADSA and ASAS.


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    Aug
    01
    Clanton and Wallace honored at GLNC


    By: Lucy Schroeder, ASAS Communications Intern

    At the 5th Grazing Livestock Nutrition Conference (GLNC) in Park City, retired animal scientists Dr. Don Clanton and Dr. Joe Wallace were honored for their contributions to grazing livestock nutrition through conducting research, mentoring graduate students in their studies, and establishing the very first GLNC. Although neither Dr. Clanton nor Dr. Wallace was able to make it to Park City, interviews with both men were video recorded prior to GLNC so that GLNC attendees were able to get to know the history of GLNC as well as Dr. Clanton and Dr. Wallace.

    Dr. Don Clanton received his B.S. in Animal Science from Colorado A&M (now Colorado State University) in 1949, after serving with Aviation Cadets Core Program of the Army Air Corp in World War II. He later received his M.S. from Montana State University, then his Ph.D. from Utah State University. Dr. Clanton then worked at the University of Nebraska, where he pioneered the Beef Cattle Research Program.

    Dr. Joe Wallace received his B.S from New Mexico State University in Animal Husbandry. He received his M.S. from Texas A&M, after which he began a career at Burns Research Station of the Eastern Oregon Cattle Research Center in 1958. Dr. Wallace later returned to school and received his Ph.D. from Colorado State University. He retired after 21 years of service from New Mexico State University where he helped develop a nationally and internationally recognized doctoral program in ruminant nutrition.


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    Aug
    01
    Beck awarded Animal Management Award


    By Jamie Hawley, ASAS Communications Intern

    August 1, 2016 – Dr. Paul A. Beck was named the recipient of the 2016 American Society of Animal Science (ASAS) Animal Management Award by the ASAS during its annual meeting in Salt Lake City, Utah.

    Dr. Beck received B.S. and M.S. degrees in Animal Science from Oklahoma State University in 1990 and 1993, respectively, and his Ph.D. in Animal Science in May 2003 from the University of Arkansas. Dr. Beck is currently a Professor of Animal Science at the University of Arkansas Southwest Research & Extension Center in Hope, Arkansas. Because of his experiences in production agriculture with first-hand knowledge of the importance of production efficiency, Dr. Beck’s research and Extension programs focus on the study of systems for sustainable, economical, and environmentally sound production practices.

    Dr. Beck’s research includes forage-based systems for cow-calf and stocker cattle operations in the Southeastern United States, backgrounding diets for growing cattle, and the effects of pre-finishing management on finishing performance and carcass quality. Dr. Beck and his wife Melissa have three children Richard (US Army), Matt (Oklahoma State), and Mary Kate (University of Arkansas).


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    Aug
    01
    Pesqueira awarded Omega Protein Innovative Research Award


    By Jamie Hawley, ASAS Communications Intern

    August 1, 2016 – Ms. Amanda Pesqueira was named the recipient of the 2016 Omega Protein Innovative Research Award by the American Society of Animal Science (ASAS) during its annual meeting in Salt Lake City, Utah.

    Ms. Pesqueira was born in Brazil. She completed her Bachelor of Science degree in Animal Science from Maringa State University (Brazil) in 2013, after being an exchange student at the University of Kentucky for one year in 2012. After graduating, Ms. Pesqueira began her master’s degree program in Ruminant Nutrition at the University of Kentucky in 2013, with Dr. David Harmon. She defended her masters in the Spring semester of 2016 and will continue her studies in Ruminant Nutrition at the University of Kentucky as a Ph.D. student with Dr. David Harmon, beginning in the fall of 2016.

    The Omega Protein Innovative Research Award promotes and rewards original and innovative research using marine fish products (meal or oil) in nutritional programs for swine, poultry, beef, dairy, horses, aquaculture, and companion or exotic animals. The Omega  Protein Innovative Research Award is sponsored by the Omega Protein Corporation.


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    Aug
    01
    Western Section names new officers


    August 1, 2016 – The Western Section of the American Society of Animal Science (WSASAS) announced its new Executive Committee officers at the annual meeting in Salt Lake City, Utah.


    We extend a warm welcome to the new WSASAS officers:

    President – Dr. Shanna Ivey, New Mexico State University

    President Elect – Dr. Connie Larson, Zinpro Corporation


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    Aug
    01
    Northeastern Section Director announced


    August 1, 2016 – The Northeast Section of the American Society of Animal Science announced its new Section Director at the annual meeting in Salt Lake City, Utah. Dr. Kristen Govoni of the University of Connecticut will replace Dr. Thomas Hoagland, also of the University of Connecticut. We extend a warm welcome to Dr. Govoni and a special thank you to Dr. Hoagland for his years of service as Northeastern Section Director!

     


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    Aug
    01
    JAM Graduate Student Symposium summary


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    By: Lucy Schroeder, ASAS Communications Intern

    August 1, 2016 – The American Society of Animal Science hosted their Graduate Student Symposium on Friday, July 22, at the 2016 Joint Annual Meeting (JAM) in Salt Lake City. This symposium focused on helping graduate students with achieving their career goals. The speaker line-up consisted of Dr. Ryan Yamka (Pet Food R&D Consultant), Dr. Michelle Calvo-Lornezo (Elanco Animal Health), Dr. Justin Crosswhite (North Dakota State University), and Dr. Joel Caton (North Dakota State University).




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    Jul
    28
    New ASAS public policy statement


    July 28, 2016 – The American Society of Animal Science (ASAS)  has released an updated policy statement about preserving the benefits of antibiotics for people and animals. For your convenience, the text is provided here or you may view the pdf here: https://asas.org/membership-services/public-policy/policy-statements.

    Rationale

    Antibiotics and other antimicrobial agents are used widely against pathogens for protection of human and animal health. Production of sufficient safe and nutritious animal-sourced foods for human consumption is necessary for the security of the US and global food supply. To ensure this production and animal wellbeing, proper management of livestock includes appropriate use of vaccines, parasiticides, good handling and housing practices, and appropriate nutrition. These practices can reduce, but not eliminate, disease incidence. Prudent use of antimicrobial agents remains necessary for prevention, control, and treatment of infectious disease in food animals.

    Although microorganisms can naturally develop resistance to this class of drugs, concern about increasing incidence of drug resistance is growing among scientists, health professionals, and the public. Loss of effective antimicrobial therapies poses a potential threat to public health. As one outcome of these concerns, growth promotion and feed efficiency claims are voluntarily being removed from medically important feed-grade antibiotics. These antimicrobials will move from over-the counter to veterinary feed directive (VFD) 1 status. This change in labeling will require livestock producers to work closely with licensed veterinarians for authorized use of VFD antimicrobial drugs. Recommended guidelines for both producers and manufacturers have also been issued by the FDA2,3. To safeguard the effectiveness of antimicrobial therapies and reduce the emergence of drug resistant organisms, antimicrobial drugs must be used judiciously in both humans and animals, according to scientific evidence-based practices.


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