Featured Articles

  • Shadow
    Jun
    09
    Vote: Constitution and by-laws to add new ASAS sections


    June 9, 2016 – The By-Laws vote concerning changes to ASAS governance is still open. This new ballot for a Constitution and By-laws vote is being brought forth by the ASAS Board of Directors to allow the board to continue to move forward with expansion of the ASAS Membership.

    In accordance with our governance, this vote is being opened more than 60 days before the business meeting. The vote will be closed down 14 days before the business meeting and reopened during the business meeting to allow final in person voting. Therefore, both sets of Constitutions and Bylaws votes will conclude at the 2016 ASAS Annual Business Meeting in July 2016.

    Reasoning for current proposal from ASAS Board of Directors: In responses to one of the objectives in the 2008 to 2014 ASAS Strategic Plan, ASAS has been actively recruiting members from outside the United States to expand and diversify our membership. As a result a full 30% of ASAS Professional Members are now from countries outside the United States. The ASAS Board of Directors would like to continue to provide services and to allow international members to fully engage in the society. Therefore, the ASAS Board would like to add language to the ASAS Constitution and Bylaws that will allow the addition of new sections. Please note, the board has been working with members of the Australian Society of Animal Production to have the Australians join us as our first international section. In order to make this partnership official, we need to add language to the Constitution and By-laws. The ASAS Board of Directors recommends a “yes” vote to the constitution and bylaws changes outline below.

    Change Article V Section 1 


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    Jun
    06
    Missed the beef webinar last Friday?


    June 6, 2016 – A recording of the June 3rd ASAS webinar about the newly released Nutrient Requirements of Beef Cattle: Eighth Revised Edition (2016) is now available online. Webinar panelists included Dr. Joel Caton, North Dakota State University; Dr. Clint Krehbiel, Oklahoma State University; and Dr. Ron Lemenager, Purdue University. They discussed revisions relating to cattle maintenance, growth and reproduction. 

    The Nutrient Requirements of Beef Cattle: Eighth Revised Edition (2016) is formerly known as the “Beef NRC.”

    A recording of the May 25th ASAS webinar, featuring an overview of the revised publication by Dr. Mike Galyean, Chair of the Committee on Nutrient Requirements of Beef Cattle, also is available. Access a recording of the webinar here.

    Plan ahead to attend a symposium focusing on the revised Nutrient Requirements of Beef Cattle, scheduled for the morning of Thursday, July 21, during the 2016 Joint Annual Meeting in Salt Lake City, Utah.


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    Jun
    06
    New JAS interpretive summary


    By Jamie Hawley, ASAS Communications Intern

    June 6, 2016 – Beef carcasses that exhibit dark cutting are known to have differences in tenderness and flavor, in addition to lean color that is undesirable to consumers. However, data addressing varying degrees of dark cutting on tenderness and specific flavor notes is lacking.

    Adria Grayson and colleagues at Texas A&M University, along with collaborators at the U.S. Meat Animal Research Center in Clay Center, Neb., observed that differences in beef juiciness, tenderness, and flavor were dependent on dark cutting severity. Their results are published in the June 2016 issue of the Journal of Animal Science.

    During carcass grading at a large U.S. commercial beef harvesting facility, 160 dark cutting and 160 matching normal carcasses were selected. Dark cutting carcasses were classified as shady, mild, moderate, or severe.


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    Jun
    06
    Vote: 2016 ASAS National Elections


    June 6, 2016 – Members of the American Society of Animal Science have the opportunity to vote for President-Elect and three Directors-at-Large to serve on the Board of Directors of ASAS. The term of office for each will be three years. You also have the opportunity to vote for a Graduate Director to serve on the ASAS Board for a two-year term. Terms for these offices begin at the conclusion of the 2016 Joint Annual Meeting (JAM) in Salt Lake City, UT. Voting must be completed by June 21, 2016. 
    Click here to Vote

    For the 2016-2017 election cycle, the ASAS National Board seeks to fill the following positions:

    President-Elect:

    Director-at-Large (total of three positions):


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    Jun
    06
    We've got mail!


    June 6, 2016 – ASAS is accepting letters from the membership for publication in Taking Stock. Below is our first submission. If you would like to submit a letter for consideration, please follow these guidelines.

    Dear Fellow Members of the American Society of Animal Science,

    Every year I look forward to our annual regional Midwest Meeting, as it is a great venue for the most recent swine nutrition research. I was not disappointed this year, as there were many interesting papers presented. However, I was disheartened to hear discussions, feedback, or “buzz” surrounding “over-branding” of presentations this year. As a member of the allied industry and a relatively seasoned presenter at ASAS meetings, I feel that we could be sending the wrong message to our future scientists. Furthermore, is this “over-branding” message creating distrust among consumers?

    I have been trained and reminded yearly as a presenter not to over-brand my presentations, especially since I work in the allied industry. The rationale for this is that scientific meetings are for unbiased reporting of the facts. Science is already scrutinized and not trusted. “In science we trust…up to a point” by Adam Rutherford (The Guardian, August 22, 2015) points out how easy it is for people to mistrust data as ‘We are fed fudgings, misunderstandings, errors and fabrications every day.’ The author goes on to state that science can still be trusted for now, but there still is need for reform.


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  • Shadow
    Jun
    03
    Western Section elections


    June 3, 2016 – Western Section Members: For the 2016-2017 election cycle, the Western Section must fill positions for 1) Secretary-Treasurer, 2) WSASAS Representative to the National Board and 3) Western Section Graduate Director.

    This year’s candidates are:

    Secretary -Treasurer – Dr. Kimberly Vonnahme (to serve a four-year term, which includes one year as Secretary-Treasurer, one year as President-Elect, one year as President, and one year as Past President)

    Western Section Representative to the National Board – Dr. Glenn Duff and Dr. Scott Lake (one candidate to serve a three-year term)


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  • Shadow
    Jun
    02
    Tips for making a successful e-Poster




    You will submit your e-Poster as a PowerPoint file. However, you should not treat it as a linear PowerPoint presentation. The e-Poster technology allows you to design a poster that is interactive and more in-depth.

    During the design process, you are allowed to include multiple slides. In the example provided here, the first slide provides links that lead to other slides which contain supporting data, such as graphs. The e-Poster technology also allows you to embed videos, animations, images, url links, and more. That means your finished product is a nonlinear, interactive, and more in-depth way of showcasing your research.

    Access e-Poster templates under the “Upload an e-Poster” text, located here.


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  • Shadow
    Jun
    02
    Recording of first "Beef NRC" webinar now online


    June 2, 2016 – A recording of the May 25 ASAS webinar about the newly released Nutrient Requirements of Beef Cattle: Eighth Revised Edition (2016), formerly known as the “Beef NRC,” is now available online.

    During the webinar, Dr. Mike Galyean, Chair of the Committee on Nutrient Requirements of Beef Cattle, gives an overview of the revised publication.

    Access the recording here.

    The next webinar in the series is scheduled for Friday, June 3 at noon (CST). Registration is free! More details available here.


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  • Shadow
    Jun
    02
    Get involved in future meetings!


    June 2, 2016 – Planning for the scientific programs of 2017 ASAS meetings is currently underway, and members are invited to submit their ideas for symposia. Submitting symposia ideas provides membership with the opportunity to steer the direction of the meetings and ensures that meetings are timely and relevant.

    Membership suggestion forms for the meetings below are open until June 30, 2016 at 11:59 pm, CDT. These ideas will then be forwarded to program committees for review and possible development into a symposium.

    ASAS-CSAS Annual Meeting and Trade Show

    ADSA Midwest Branch and ASAS Midwestern Section Meeting


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  • Shadow
    Jun
    02
    Early registration for GLNC ends tomorrow


    5th_GLNC
    June 2, 2016 – The 5th Grazing Livestock Nutrition Conference is scheduled for July 17-19 in Park City, Utah. Register today to take advantage of the $25 savings. Discounts end at 11:59 pm CDT on Friday, June 3.The meeting will focus on enhancing management, production and sustainability of grazing ruminants in extensive landscapes.

    Please join us for the exciting and informative plenary sessions, posters and networking opportunities at the Canyons Resort in the mountains of Park City.

    Register today to take advantage of the $25 savings.

    Reserve your hotel room. Sleeping rooms in the main hotel are going fast, so lock in your space today!


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  • Shadow
    Jun
    02
    ARS and NIFA seek stakeholder input


    June 2, 2016 – The USDA’s Agricultural Research Service (ARS) and the National Institute of Food and Agriculture (NIFA) are seeking input from stakeholders, customers, and partners regarding animal production programs. Share input using a new online “ideas engine.” Indicate your willingness to participate by June 6.

    Stakeholders are asked to provide input on how Federal investments can best address current needs and challenges facing animal production. This input will help form the framework for developing the next ARS National Program Action Plan and defining priorities for NIFA’s animal production research, education and extension. Information on these programs can be found at these links for ARS and NIFA.

    If you are interested in providing your insight by suggesting, refining, and prioritizing ideas around any of the topics listed below, simply send an email with your name, affiliation, email address, and topic of interest (in the format provided below) to Insight@nifa.usda.gov by June 6th. You will receive instructions on how to join.  You can participate as much as you like, when you like, while the system is open during the month of June 2016.

    Topic 1:  Animal Genetics, Genomics and Bioinformatics


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  • Shadow
    May
    26
    JAM symposium to highlight science communication


    May 26, 2016 – Make plans to attend “Communicating animal sciences effectively,” a Contemporary and Emerging Issues Symposium, to be held the afternoon of Wed., July 20, during the 2016 Joint Annual Meeting (2016 JAM) in Salt Lake City, Utah.

    * Public perceptions of animal-sourced genetically modified food products, by Bill Hallman, Rutgers University


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  • Shadow
    May
    26
    Resources to help you communicate science


    May 26, 2016 – Need help communicating your research to a non-scientific audience? There is help! Here is a nifty collection of science communication resources from our science policy friends at the Agronomy, Crop, Soil and Environmental Science Societies (ACSESS).

    Elected Officials are Human, Too

    Communication 101: Communication Basics for Scientists and Engineers

    Engaging With Policymakers (Be sure to check out the tips in the sidebar)


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  • Shadow
    May
    26
    Agricultural research needs to be a priority


    By Clint Krehbiel, ASAS Public Policy Committee

    As the world’s population is projected to grow by one-third by the year 2050, sustainably meeting the nutritional needs of a growing population and its demand for meat, dairy, and fish consumption will require a significant investment in research and development so that the productivity of today can be enhanced to meet the increased demands of the future. In addition to enhanced animal production, research will be required to determine and respond to the impacts of changes in the global environment on animal agriculture, how to improve equitable distribution of animal agricultural products, and how to improve engagement and communication between those involved in animal agriculture and the public (NRC, 2015). Research to ensure sustainable agricultural growth will be critical to addressing this global challenge to food security.

    Advances in animal agriculture have been a result of research and development of new technologies (Roberts et al., 2009). In 2015, the value of U.S. food animal production was projected to be approximately $190 billion and the value of crop production projected to be $185 billion, representing 45 and 43 percent, respectively, of the total value of the agricultural sector (USDA ERS, 2016). However, the U.S. is allocating less than 0.20 percent, including both National Institute of Food and Agriculture (NIFA) and USDA Agricultural Research Service (ARS) appropriations, of the U.S. food animal production value back into publicly funded animal science research (NRC, 2015). The neglect of investment in animal agriculture is contrary to the significant economic value and high rate of return of this sector to the United States and globally. There are various sources of funding for research and development, including private funding, but public funding should address longer-term research needs, and support research that addresses public goods.

    Dr. Sonny Ramaswamy, Director of the NIFA, recently blogged that in 2002, 24 percent of the proposals submitted to the National Research Initiative Competitive Grants Program (NRI) were funded. Today, the funding rate for the Agriculture and Food Research Initiative (AFRI), which replaced the NRI program, is approximately 10 percent. In FY 2014, NIFA received 3,875 proposals for funding by the AFRI program, of which 1,640 were recommended for funding; however, NIFA could only fund 390 proposals with the resources available (Ramaswamy, 2016). Dr. Ramaswamy’s concern was that due to the limited funding success, many talented scientists and researchers are leaving agricultural sciences at a time when the need for their innovation is greatest, or that their taking expertise to other countries that are more supportive of public sector research. Due to a growing population, science-based information related to climate change, diminishing land and water resources, and food security is becoming ever more urgent. Support for research becomes even more critical when one considers new and invasive species of pests, antimicrobial resistance, pollinator health, sustainability, human and animal health and nutritional outcomes, and the need for innovations for advanced manufacturing and economic enterprises. As suggested by Dr. Ramaswamy, “funding research to respond to these challenges should be considered as an investment in our Nation’s future, an investment that will pay big dividends in the years to come.”


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  • Shadow
    May
    26
    Growing food for growing cities


    By Cassie Welch, ASAS Public Policy Committee

    May 26, 2016 – The Chicago Council on Global Affairs hosted their annual Global Food Security Symposium: Growing Food for Growing Cities in Washington, D.C. on April 26, 2016. During the opening session, the Council released its newest report that details in-depth the rapid growth of cities and resulting pressures on the food supply chain from inputs, production and processing to trade, retailing and consumers. Multi-disciplinary stakeholders came together to discuss the heightened demand for safe and nutritious food associated with increasing urbanization and how the global food system must transform to meet this demand.

    Growth of the world’s cities is exploding, especially in low- and middle-income countries in Africa, Asia and Latin America. Among the top 10 most populous “mega” cities in the year 2100, seven are predicted to be in Africa and three in India. Increasing populations and urbanization have resulted in an unprecedented demand for food, creating a serious food security challenge. However, it is also an opportunity to improve the lives of millions of small-scale farmers and rural residents, who themselves may be food insecure, by presenting them with business and economic opportunities to integrate with urban markets.

    Food systems are currently changing to meet these demands, whereby supply chains are getting longer – reaching farther into rural areas in order to feed cities, new technologies are affecting every step in the food value chain, and retail markets are changing – from the way food is procured to how it is sold. Supply chain transformation will benefit both farmers and consumers; however, this transformation doesn’t come without challenges. As the supply chain grows, so does the potential for food waste. Water, already scarce in many regions of the world, may become more limited as competition increases in cities and on the farm. Additionally, poor storage capabilities and infrastructure of roads and highways impedes transportation of food, resulting in loss of market access for farmers and food waste.


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  • Shadow
    May
    26
    Read this editorial in latest WAAP newsletter


    waap
    May 26, 2016 – A new issue of The World Animal Science News, the World Association for Animal Production’s (WAAP) newsletter, is now available. The issue contains an editorial co-authored by Dr. Jim Sartin, Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Animal Science, and Dr. Meghan Wulster-Radcliffe, ASAS CEO. The editorial discusses “Challenges of animal production in a global world; how scientific societies can contribute to solutions.”




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  • Shadow
    May
    26
    Nutrient Requirements of Beef Cattle webinar set for June 3


    May 26, 2016 – The second in a series of ASAS webinars about the newly released Nutrient Requirements of Beef Cattle: Eighth Revised Edition (2016), formerly known as the “Beef NRC,” is scheduled for Friday, June 3 at noon (CDT).

    Join us for a discussion of key changes in the Nutrient Requirements of Beef Cattle: Eighth Revised Edition (2016). Registration is free! Guest speakers include Dr. Joel Caton, North Dakota State University; Dr. Clint Krehbiel, Oklahoma State University; and Dr. Ron Lemenager, Purdue University. They will discuss revisions relating to cattle maintenance, growth and reproduction.

    To register, click here.

    During the first webinar, Dr. Mike Galyean, Dean of the College of Agricultural Sciences & Natural Resources at Texas Tech University and Chair of the Committee on Nutrient Requirements of Beef Cattle, shared an overview of the revised publication. The webinar was sponsored by Zinpro. Access a recording of the webinar here.


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  • Shadow
    May
    23
    Share your student science fair projects


    May 23, 2016 – Do you know a Jr. Animal Scientist who did a science fair project focused on animal science? If so, we’d like to feature the student’s project in an upcoming issue of the Jr. Animal Scientist e-newsletter! Let us know the details by sending an email to animalsmart@asas.org.

    The young lady pictured here completed a science fair poster about rabbit digestion. She compared the digestibility of alfalfa-based pellets and timothy-based pellets fed to her three pet rabbits.


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  • Shadow
    May
    23
    JAM early registration deadline is June 3


    May 23, 2016 – Early registration for the 2016 ADSA®-ASAS-CSAS-WSASAS Joint Annual Meeting ends June 3 at 11:59 pm CDT. Register today to take advantage of the early registration savings. The meeting is July 19-23 in Salt Lake City, Utah.

    New to JAM 2016:

    Returning to JAM 2016:

    Visit the JAM website for more information on:


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  • Shadow
    May
    23
    Vote on proposal to add new ASAS sections


    May 23, 2016 – Voting members of ASAS: Please note that the By-Laws vote concerning changes to ASAS governance is still open. In addition, a new ballot for a Constitution and By-laws vote has been brought forth by the ASAS Board of Directors. The proposed amendment would allow the board to continue to move forward with expansion of the ASAS Membership. In accordance with our governance, this vote is being opened more than 60 days before the business meeting. The vote will be closed down 14 days before the business meeting and reopened during the business meeting to allow final in-person voting. Therefore, both sets of Constitutions and Bylaws votes will conclude at the 2016 ASAS Annual Business Meeting in July 2016.

    Reasoning for current proposal from ASAS Board of Directors: In response to one of the objectives in the 2008 to 2014 ASAS Strategic Plan, ASAS has been actively recruiting members from outside the United States to expand and diversify our membership. As a result, a full 30% of ASAS Professional Members are now from countries outside the United States. The ASAS Board of Directors would like to continue to provide services and to allow international members to fully engage in the society. Therefore, the ASAS Board would like to add language to the ASAS Constitution and Bylaws that will allow the addition of new sections. Please note, the board has been working with members of the Australian Society of Animal Production to have the Australians join us as our first international section. In order to make this partnership official, we need to add language to the Constitution and By-laws. The ASAS Board of Directors recommends a “yes” vote to the constitution and bylaws changes outlined below.

    Change Article V Section 1

    From: The AMERICAN SOCIETY OF ANIMAL SCIENCE, INC. shall consist of four sectional divisions: Midwestern, Northeastern, Southern, and Western.


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