Featured Articles

  • Aug
    29
    American Innovation and Competitiveness Act


    By Penny Riggs, ASAS Public Policy Committee Chair

    August 29, 2016 – To invest in innovation through research and development, and to improve the competitiveness of the United States, the American Innovation and Competitiveness Act, S. 3084, was introduced in the Senate in June, with support of Senators Cory Gardner (R–CO), Gary Peters (D–MI), John Thune (R–SD), and Bill Nelson (D–FL). The bill was quickly passed by the Senate Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation with strong bipartisan support. This important bill would benefit scientific research through language to maximize basic research and reform federal science agencies. By reducing administrative burdens for researchers, enhancing agency oversight, and improving research dissemination, this legislation aims to increase the return on investment for taxpayer-funded research.

    As previously described in Taking Stock, the 2010 America COMPETES Act expired in 2013. The prior House version was called the FIRST Act. The current bill retains the existing peer review process of the National Science Foundation (NSF). As noted in Science, the inclusion of language to ease administrative burdens on campus-based research is “music to the ears of university officials,” as well as research faculty. Amendments added in committee to the current bill would authorize funding for the National Science Foundation and the National Institute of Standards and Technology. Other components of the bill call for awards for excellence in STEM mentoring, improved undergraduate STEM opportunities, and additional leveraging of private sector resources.

    Although it is uncertain whether the bill will make it to the Senate floor this fall, American investment in basic scientific research clearly remains a critical need. As noted in this article in Taking Stock, research outcomes that enhance agricultural productivity are essential. Agricultural research can benefit from increased support of funding and fewer regulatory burdens across multiple federal research agencies.


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  • Aug
    29
    Update on Global Food Security Act


    By Cassie Welch, ASAS Public Policy Committee

    August 29, 2016 – On July 20, President Barack Obama signed into law the Global Food Security Act – a bipartisan bill expanding food security priorities and the ability to build capacity for agricultural growth in developing nations. The signing was applauded by agricultural and global development sectors during the White House Summit on Global Development, which was held on the same day as the signing.

    The new law, S. 1252, provides authorization of more than $7 billion for international agriculture and food programs and requires the executive branch to coordinate efforts of relevant federal agencies to address global food security and malnutrition.

    Obama referenced the act as a means of reaching those most affected by food insecurity and as a way to ensure programs, such as Feed the Future, “endure well into the future.” As a presidential initiative created in 2009 by the Obama administration, Feed the Future has helped reduce poverty up to 26% and provided improved nutrition to nearly 18 million more children in areas where its programs are active. In 2015, Feed the Future reached over 9 million smallholder farmers around the globe, whereby the adoption of improved agricultural practices has helped to increase their incomes by more than $800 million.


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  • Aug
    29
    Federal GMO food-labeling law passed


    By Michael Azain, ASAS Public Policy Committee

    August 29, 2016 – President Obama signed a Federal labeling law at the end of July nullifying the Vermont law that took effect on July 1 (See GMO food labeling set to take effect, Taking Stock D.C., April 26, 2016). The law directs the Secretary of Agriculture to establish a national mandatory bioengineered food disclosure system.

    The legislation moved quickly through Congress. The bill was introduced in the Senate by Pat Roberts (R-Kan.) and Debbie Stabenow (D-Mich.) in June and replaced proposed voluntary labeling legislation that failed to pass the Senate in March. The current bill was approved by the Senate on July 7 and the House a week later.

    Over 1,100 companies and organizations in the food industry expressed support for the legislation, as it eliminates the possibility of individual states having their own labeling requirements. This was a concern with the Vermont law. Specific language in the bill states that a GM food that has gone through the pre-market regulatory process cannot be labeled as being more or less safe than a non-GMO food. It also stipulates that food products from animals fed GMOs do not need to be labeled as GMO. The bill prohibits states from imposing their own restrictions in addition to what is covered under the federal legislation.


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  • Aug
    29
    NSF requests feedback on strategic plan


    August 29, 2016 – The National Science Foundation is beginning the process of updating its Strategic Plan. As part of that process, the Foundation invites feedback on the Vision, Core Values, Strategic Goals and Strategic Objectives described in the current NSF Strategic Plan, located at http://www.nsf.gov/about/performance/strategic_plan.jsp.

    The Foundation welcomes your input. Please provide comments on the current Strategic Plan through the website: https://www.nsf.gov/od/oia/strategicplan/feedback.jsp. Please send any questions to strategicplan@nsf.gov.


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  • Aug
    25
    Tolleson awarded Extension Award


    By Jamie Hawley, ASAS Communications Intern

    August 25, 2016 – Dr. Doug R. Tolleson was named the recipient of the 2016 Extension Award by the Western Section, American Society of Animal Science (WSASAS), during its annual meeting last month in Salt Lake City, Utah.

    Dr. Tolleson received a B.S. in Animal Science, M.S. in Physiology of Reproduction, and Ph.D. in Rangeland Ecology and Management from Texas A&M University. He has been an Assistant or Associate Extension Specialist and Research Scientist for Rangeland Management at the University of Arizona from 2008 to 2016. He has provided information on sustainable rangeland management to the ranching and natural resource management community. Dr. Tolleson has conducted research on rangeland management topics, primarily dealing with livestock grazing and nutrition, wildlife, wildfire, and range monitoring techniques. These monitoring efforts inform ranch management on public land allotments and are part of helping ranchers renew their grazing permits during environmental impact assessments as required by the National Environmental Policy Act.

    Dr. Tolleson is a member of the Editorial Board for the Ruminant Nutrition Division for the Journal of Animal Science and serves as Liaison to the Society for Range Management for the American Society of Animal Science. He has published 27 refereed journal papers, 36 other peer reviewed publications, 116 abstracts, and 30 popular press or newsletter articles. Dr. Tolleson has secured over $2.5 million in contracts and grants since 1999. He has delivered 33 invited talks or lectures and 135 extension presentations. He serves as a member of the Advisory Council, Western Center for Risk Management Education and has been a Director for the Natural Resource Conservation Workshop for Arizona Youth for 7 years.


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  • Aug
    25
    Cooke receives Young Scientist Award


    By Jamie Hawley, ASAS Communications Intern

    August 25, 2016 – Dr. Reinaldo F. Cooke was named the recipient of the 2016 Young Scientist Award by the Western Section, American Society of Animal Science (WSASAS), during its annual meeting last month in Salt Lake City, Utah.

    Dr. Cooke is an associate professor in the Department of Animal and Rangeland Sciences at Oregon State University (OSU). He leads an active research program focused on management strategies to improve productivity of forage-based cow-calf operations, including cattle nutrition, health, growth, and reproductive responses. His research findings have resulted in invitations to speak at numerous local, national, and international events.

    Dr. Cooke has authored or coauthored 71 refereed journal articles, 2 book chapters, 44 proceedings papers, 21 peer reviewed extension articles, 80 conference abstracts, 34 station reports, and 35 popular press articles. To date he has mentored 9 M.S. students, 4 Ph.D. students, and 27 interns. He is also the editor of the Oregon Beef Council Research Report, OSU Beef Research Report, OSU Beef Cattle Library, and co-chair of the Western Beef Resource Committee’s Cattle Producer’s Handbook. Furthermore, Dr. Cooke has secured a total of $3,168,651 from private and public, national, and international institutions.


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  • Aug
    25
    ASAS member honored by ARPAS




    The ARPAS Distinguished Professional Animal Scientist Award recognizes an emeritus or retired member of the society that has been active in the society for at least 10 years prior to retirement, has served in a leadership role in ARPAS during that period, and has made a significant contribution to the animal sciences during his or her career.

    Dr. Shell received a biology degree from Pittsburg State College and M.S. and Ph.D. degrees from the University of Arizona. He joined the Ralston Purina Company in St. Louis in 1979 as a research and consulting nutritionist under the direction of Dean Hodge. Shell spent two years in the St. Louis research and technical services area before transferring to the Omaha and Sioux City divisions of Ralston Purina. He worked with the sales force in training and client support for 15 years in these divisions. In 1998, Shell started a private consulting service, Omaha Nutritional Services Inc., for feedlot and ranch enterprises. Shell’s career in ARPAS started after joining Ralston Purina at the urging of Dean Hodge. Shell has served in various positions on the ARPAS Board and was President from 1997–1998. He was an ardent supporter of hiring an executive director to help bring continuity to the board and its revolving directors. Agriculture has been a developing force in Shell’s life. Research, training, and personal relationships with clients and industry personnel have shaped his career.

    It was with great pleasure that ARPAS presented Dr. Lee Shell with the 2016 Distinguished Professional Animal Scientist Award.


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  • Aug
    25
    Check your email for survey


    August 25, 2016 – ASAS members: Check your email for a link to an ASAS strategic planning survey. The email was sent August 23, 2016.

    ASAS is actively involved in strategic planning with the goal of releasing a new strategic plan at the 2017 Annual Meeting. Involvement in strategic planning guarantees members a voice in the direction of the society. To date, we have conducted over 30 external stakeholder interviews, held 10 membership focus groups and conducted a strategic planning retreat.

    Filling out the survey provides us with your input for ASAS Strategic Planning. All answers are confidential. Questions? Email ASAS at asas@asas.org

     


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  • Aug
    22
    Plan ahead!


    Mark your calendar for these upcoming ASAS sectional meetings:

    Southern Section Meeting, February 4-7, 2017, Franklin, Tenn.



    Midwest Section Meeting, March 13-15, 2017, Omaha, Neb.

    Western Section Meeting, June 20-23, 2017, Fargo, N.D. – Watch for details coming soon!


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  • Aug
    22
    Visit the Animal Science Image Gallery


    August 22, 2016 – Have you been to the newly renovated ASAS Animal Science Image Gallery yet? The gallery, now housed at animalimagegallery.org, provides images, animations, and short videos for classroom and outreach learning.

    To supplement the visual information, each file has a description and metadata, including the origin and ownership of the image. Downloading any image within the gallery is free for ASAS members and only $5 per image for non-members. Each file in the gallery has had at least two peer reviews to optimize the image and its metadata, and to ensure that the information is sufficient and accurate.

    Submitting an image to the gallery is easy! There is no submission fee for ASAS members and only a $25 fee (per image) for non-members.

    There are more than 45 searchable categories in the gallery, and more than 600 images, so be sure to stop by the site and submit or download images today!


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  • Aug
    22
    In memory: Dr. Donald C. Mahan


    August 22, 2016 – Dr. Donald C. Mahan, an outstanding researcher, teacher, and renowned swine nutritionist, died at the age of 78 at his home, surrounded by his family. He is survived by his wife (Amy Jo), three daughters (Melanie, Jean, and Laurie), 10 grandchildren, and his brother (Gene).

    Don was the son of Clarence and Irene Mahan and was born in East Chicago, Indiana. After living in Hessville for a few years, his family moved to a farm near Lowell where he graduated from high school in 1956. He then obtained his B.S. degree in Animal Science from Purdue University before working as a County Youth Agent in Sullivan, Indiana, where he met and married Amy Jo Osburn before returning to Purdue for graduate study. After completing his M.S. degree at Purdue and his Ph.D. in Animal Nutrition at the University of Illinois, he began his professional career as an Assistant Professor at The Ohio State University in 1969.

    Dr. Mahan greatly impacted the swine and feed industries in diverse areas during his career. Although well known nationally and internationally for his Se and vitamin E research, he was also recognized for his research in other areas. His multi-parity sow research studies demonstrated the requirement for Ca and P, and that organic Se resulted in more and healthier pigs, less sow parturition problems, and greater milk Se for multiple parities. He identified the need for vitamin C, high quality dried whey, lactose, and chloride for the early weaned pig. His research was the basis for FDA’s approval for both organic and inorganic Se. Body composition research studies with sows and growing-finishing pigs helped to establish the mineral needs of swine. These are just a few of the research areas in which Dr. Mahan helped nutritionists better understand the nutrition of pigs.

    Dr. Mahan received several ASAS awards during his career, including the AFIA Nutrition Research Award, Gustav Bohstedt Award for Mineral Research, and an ASAS Fellow Award in Research. Most recently, he received the 2016 FASS-AFIA New Frontiers in Animal Nutrition Award given for his lifetime production of innovative research that significantly benefitted the livestock and feed industries. He mentored many graduate students at The Ohio State University, and authored or co-authored more than 175 refereed journal articles and over 400 other publications. He was an invited speaker at 213 conferences in several states and 50 countries.


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  • Aug
    18
    Top 10 JAS reviewers in 2015


    August 18, 2016 – During the ASAS annual business meeting last month, Dr. Jim Sartin, Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Animal Science (JAS), reported journal data for 2015. In 2015, 2,376 individuals served as reviewers for JAS. Among all of these reviewers, one group is distinguished for the number of papers reviewed. The top 10 reviewers for JAS in 2015 are:

    1.   Hans Stein

    2.   Jon Schoonmaker

    3.   David Buchanan


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  • Aug
    18
    Wang awarded Agri-King Outstanding Animal Science Graduate Student Award


    By Jamie Hawley, ASAS Communications Intern

    August 18, 2016 – Dr. Xiaoqiu (Churchill) Wang was named the recipient of the 2016 Agri-King Outstanding Animal Science Graduate Student Award by the American Society of Animal Science (ASAS) during its annual meeting in Salt Lake City, Utah.

    Dr. Wang recently graduated with a Ph.D. in Physiology of Reproduction under the mentorship of Drs. Fuller W. Bazer and Guoyao Wu. He received his B.S. degree in Animal Science from China Agricultural University (Beijing, China) and completed an internship at Tokyo University of Agriculture (Tokyo, Japan) before joining Texas A&M University. Dr. Wang’s research focused on mechanisms associated with the establishment and maintenance of pregnancy in ruminants and pigs.

    Dr. Wang has received world-wide recognition as the recipient of the 2015 U.S. Department of Agriculture-National Institute of Food and Agriculture-Agriculture and Food Research Initiative Merit Award and 2015 Alltech Young Scientist. He also received Distinguished Graduate Student Award from Texas A&M University this April. To date, he has published 30 peer-reviewed papers (10 as first-author and 20 as co-author), one book chapter, and 14 research abstracts. Dr. Wang is now a postdoctoral fellow in National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences and his long-term goal is to become a leading animal scientist who will make a world of difference.


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  • Aug
    18
    Moyes awarded 2016 Young Scientist – Research


    By Jamie Hawley, ASAS Communications Intern

    August 18, 2016 – Dr. Kasey Moyes has been named the recipient of the 2016 Young Scientist – Research Award by the Northeast Section, American Society of Animal Science (NE ASAS), and the Northeast Section of the American Dairy Science Association® (ADSA).



    In 2001, Dr. Moyes’ career in science began as a graduate student at the University of Connecticut where she developed an interest in the field of bovine mastitis. Upon completion of her M.S. in 2004, she joined the doctoral program in Animal Sciences at the University of Illinois. Following completion of her Ph.D. in 2008, she continued her post-doctoral training at Aarhus University. Dr. Moyes joined the Animal and Avian Sciences Department at the University of Maryland as an assistant professor in 2012 where she holds a research and teaching appointment. Her research program has focused on mastitis and the interaction of nutrition and immune responses in lactating dairy cows. Her work includes the use of alternative therapeutics for the treatment of mastitis.


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  • Aug
    18
    D’Amico awarded 2016 Young Scientist – Educator


    By Jamie Hawley, ASAS Communications Intern

    August 18, 2016 – Dr. Dennis D’Amico has been named the recipient of the 2016 Young Scientist – Educator Award by the Northeast Section, American Society of Animal Science (NE ASAS), and the Northeast Section of the American Dairy Science Association® (ADSA) during the annual meeting in Salt Lake City, Utah. 

    Dr. D’Amico has spent his career serving the dairy industry in the northeast. At the University of Connecticut (UConn), he expanded his regional workshops to provide education on safe cheese‐making practices, regulations, and public policy. To date the Artisan/Farmstead Cheesemaker Food Safety Workshop program has directly reached over 750 attendees including cheesemakers, educators, retailers, and regulators across the U.S. Dr. D’Amico has worked directly with more than 40 small dairy businesses in the northeast to build an integrated research, education, and outreach program focused on supporting and enhancing the safety and quality of value-added dairy production.

    Dr. D’Amico’s laboratory group concurrently conducts basic and applied research to fill data gaps and develop preventive controls for small dairy producers to further minimize the risks of contamination. Dr. D’Amico’s research lab also serves as an educational tool through the mentoring of graduate and undergraduate students on research in dairy science and microbiology. At UConn, he developed Dairy Technology classes that emphasize hands on learning activities so students can further explore their specific interests in dairy science while developing their research and writing skills.


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  • Aug
    18
    Northeast honors Young Scientists


    August 18, 2016 – Two individuals have been named recipients of 2016 Young Scientist awards, given by the Northeast Section of the American Society of Animal Science (NE ASAS) and the Northeast Branch of the American Dairy Science Association® (ADSA). Dr. Dennis D’Amico was awarded the 2016 Young Scientist – Educator Award, and Dr. Kasey Moyes received the 2016 Young Scientist – Research Award. The recipients were honored during the ASAS/ADSA Northeast Section annual business meeting, held July 22, in Salt Lake City, Utah.

    Learn more about Dr. D’Amico’s award in this press release.

    Learn more about Dr. Moyes’ award in this press release.


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  • Aug
    18
    Five awarded Wilson G. Pond International Travel Award


    asasfoundation
    By Jamie Hawley, ASAS Communications Intern

    August 18, 2016 – Ms. Deidre D. Harmon,  Ms. Faithe Keomanivong, Ms. Gloria A. Casa, Ms. Jill Larson, and Mr. Matthew Crouse were named the recipients of the 2016 Wilson G. Pond International Travel Award by the American Society of Animal Science (ASAS) during its annual meeting in Salt Lake City, Utah.

    Ms. Harmon grew up on a cow-calf Charolais farm in Galax, Virginia. She received her B.S. in Biology from Virginia Commonwealth University in 2011 where she also minored in Chemistry. From there, she pursued a M.S. in Animal and Poultry Sciences from Virginia Tech University where she focused her research on phosphorus excretion in forage fed beef cattle. Upon completing her degree at Virginia Tech University in the summer of 2014, Ms. Harmon started a doctoral program in Crop and Soil Sciences at the University of Georgia.

    Ms. Harmon is currently working on an interdisciplinary project focusing on the evaluation of warm season annual forages in forage-finishing beef cattle production systems. She hopes to pursue an academic career developing comprehensive extension programs on the utilization of forages in beef cattle production systems.


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  • Aug
    17
    Innovate postponed


    Innovate 2016, originally scheduled for September 14-16 in Brainerd, Minn., has now been postponed. We apologize for the misinformation in the Monday, August 15th issue of Taking Stock and any confusion it may have caused. We are postponing Innovate in recognition of the overlap with the Annual Conference of the American Association of Bovine Practitioners (AABP).

    Details about the next Innovate meeting will be available as soon as possible. We are in the process of contacting and rescheduling all speakers and contacting registrants. If you have registered, please contact us and we will help transfer or refund your registration and help with plane tickets. We will announce new dates and a slightly revised speaker list by September 1.


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  • Aug
    15
    Miller awarded Meats Research Award


    By Jamie Hawley, ASAS Communications Intern

    August 15, 2016 – Dr. Rhonda K. Miller was named the recipient of the 2016 American Society of Animal Science (ASAS) Meats Research Award by the ASAS during its annual meeting in Salt Lake City, Utah.

    Dr. Miller grew up on a livestock/crop operation in Holyoke, CO and earned her B.S., M.S., and Ph.D. from Colorado State University. She conducted her Ph.D. research at the U.S. Agricultural Research Service Meat Animal Research Center in Clay Center, NE. Dr. Miller was Director of Research for Monfort, Inc. and developed over 300 meat products. She joined the Department of Animal Science at Texas A&M University in 1988 as an Assistant Professor. As a Professor in Meat Science, Dr. Miller teaches undergraduate and graduate courses in Meat and Sensory Science and is Director of the Sensory Testing Facility.

    Dr. Miller’s research has focused on pre- and post-harvest factors affecting the palatability and quality of red meat, development of automated grading technology, and the use of non-meat ingredients to improve meat quality. Currently, she is examining consumer attitudes and acceptance of beef flavor. She has published 118 journal articles, 60 extension publications, 148 abstracts, 8 book chapters, trained 60 graduate students, and obtained $10 million in grant dollars. She is active in the ASAS and is president-elect of the American Meat Science Association.


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  • Aug
    15
    Satterfield awarded ASAS Early Career Achievement Award


    By Jamie Hawley, ASAS Communications Intern

    August 15, 2016 – Dr. M. Carey Satterfield was named the recipient of the 2016 American Society of Animal Science (ASAS) Early Career Achievement Award by the ASAS during its annual meeting in Salt Lake City, Utah.

    Dr. Satterfield is an Associate Professor in the Department of Animal Science at Texas A&M University. Dr. Satterfield’s research focuses on understanding nutritional and environmental factors that alter placental and fetal growth and development. The primary goal of Dr. Satterfield’s research program is to unravel basic biological information and translate this newfound understanding into practices that can be applied for the benefit of both animal agriculture and biomedicine.

    Dr. Satterfield’s research has been funded by both the United States Department of Agriculture and National Institutes of Health, with current funding exceeding $4.5 million. Dr. Satterfield has been author or co-author on 42 peer-reviewed journal articles, 4 book chapters, 4 proceedings papers and has given 15 invited presentations. In 2013, he received the Outstanding Young Animal Scientist in Research Award from the Southern Section ASAS Scientific Meeting.


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