Featured Articles

  • Shadow
    Apr
    11
    2016 JAM symposium preview


    April 11, 2016 – The 2016 Joint Annual Meeting will include a symposium on the impact of inflammation on nutrient metabolism and animal performance. The symposium, hosted by the American Registry of Professional Animal Scientists (ARPAS), will take place on Wed., July 20, during the 2016 Joint Annual Meeting (JAM) of the American Society of Animal Science (ASAS), the American Dairy Science Association (ADSA), the Canadian Society of Animal Science (CSAS), and the Western Section of ASAS (WSASAS). The 2016 JAM will be held July 19–23 in Salt Lake City, Utah.

    Speakers will address the following topics during the symposium: (1) general information on inflammation, (2) the role of the rumen microflora in systemic inflammation, (3) inflammatory biomarkers, and (4) nutritional considerations in beef and/or dairy cattle. Speakers include Kirk Klasing, T.G. Nagaraja, Chris Chase, and Reinaldo Cooke.

    Download the full symposia list.

    ** Please note that the scientific program is still under development. **


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  • Shadow
    Apr
    08
    Green named next chancellor of University of Nebraska-Lincoln


    April 7, 2016 – Dr. Ronnie Green, an ASAS past president and Fellow, will serve as the next chancellor of the University of Nebraska-Lincoln.

    Dr. Green is currently NU’s vice president for agriculture and natural resources, Harlan Vice Chancellor of the UNL Institute of Agriculture and Natural Resources, and UNL interim senior vice chancellor for academic affairs.

    Green’s appointment is subject to approval by the Board of Regents at its May 25 meeting. If confirmed on that date, he would begin his new role immediately.

    For more information, please see this article at the UNL Newsroom.


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  • Shadow
    Apr
    08
    JAM symposium to focus on international animal agriculture


    April 7, 2016 – A symposium focusing on international animal agriculture is being planned for Wed., July 20 during the 2016 Joint Annual Meeting (JAM) of the American Society of Animal Science (ASAS), the American Dairy Science Association (ADSA), the Canadian Society of Animal Science (CSAS), and the Western Section of ASAS (WSASAS). The 2016 JAM will be held July 19–23 in Salt Lake City, Utah.

    The symposium is entitled “International Animal Agriculture: The Future of Pastoral Production Systems.”

    ** Please note that the scientific program is still under development.

    Download the full symposia list. Check the 2016 JAM website often for updates and program information.


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  • Shadow
    Apr
    05
    Meeting abstracts now fully searchable at JAS website


    jasMar2016cover



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  • Shadow
    Apr
    05
    Taking Stock wants your letters


    April 4, 2016 – ASAS is launching a Taking Stock “Letters From the Membership”, and we’d like to hear from you! The special issue will run quarterly, or more frequently, depending on the volume of letters received.

    Share your comments, concerns and topics of interest with fellow members. Email your letters to asas@asas.org and type “Taking Stock Letters” in the subject line.

    Letters are subject to approval before publication. Only letters from ASAS members in good standing will be considered for publication. Due to space considerations, please limit word count to no more than 1,000 words. Remember, Taking Stock is a public blog, so professionalism is encouraged.

     


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  • Shadow
    Apr
    05
    New JAS "Rapid Communication" section launched





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  • Shadow
    Apr
    05
    Save the date!


    April 4, 2016 – Mark your calendars and plan to join us for Innovate 2016, to be held September 14-16 at Madden’s on Gull Lake in Brainerd, Minn. The theme of this year’s program is “Emerging Innovations in Animal Health: Strategies for a Healthier & More Sustainable Animal.”

    We’ll let you know when program details are available!


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  • Shadow
    Apr
    01
    Appreciation Club honoree in the news


    March 31, 2016 – A Foundation Appreciation Club was formed last year to honor Dr. Temple Grandin. Recently, Dr. Grandin received a new honor: She will be featured on collectible trading cards by the U.S. Patent & Trademark Office (USPTO). According to an article in the The Denver Post, the USPTO created the inventors trading card series in 2012 to spur interest in inventing among children.

    Dr. Grandin is being honored for her invention of a pre-slaughter animal stunning system, which is patented.

    Learn more about the ASAS Temple Grandin Appreciation Club here.


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  • Shadow
    Apr
    01
    Be a giver this year


    March 31, 2016 – The ASAS Foundation uses dollars to provide direct financial support to our members through travel grants, honoraria, symposia planning and awards.

    In 2015, the ASAS Foundation provided more than $100,000 in membership support! The ASAS Foundation could not provide this without the generosity and support of the ASAS membership.

    We are actively fundraising for a number of Appreciation Clubs, including the Dr. Michael Galyean and the Dr. Temple Grandin Funds. For more information about these clubs and our older, more-established funds please visit the Foundation website.

    Remember ASAS and the ASAS Foundation are a 501c 3 and all donations are tax deductible.


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  • Shadow
    Apr
    01
    ASAS Foundation: Platinum sponsor of Midwest Meeting


    March 31, 2016 – The ASAS Foundation is a Platinum Level Sponsor of the 2016 Midwest Meeting, held earlier this month in Des Moines. Many symposia at the meeting are sponsored by Foundation Appreciation Clubs.

    Here are just some of the impactful symposia supported by the Foundation:

    About the photo: A great turnout at the Bentley Lecture and Lunch during the 2016 Midwest Meeting.


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  • Shadow
    Apr
    01
    Foundation: Supporting our students


    March 31, 2016 – The 2016 Midwest Meeting wrapped up earlier this month. This year’s meeting included several graduate and undergraduate student competitions. We would like to particularly thank donors of the Gretchen Hill Appreciation Club and the Tim S. Stahly & Ernie Peo Memorial and Tribute Fund for sponsoring Midwest student awards.

    In all, there were more than 25 student awards given during the meeting! If you haven’t already done so, take a look at the outcome of the various student competitions to see the Foundation in action!

    Undergraduate student competition results, sponsored by the Gretchen Hill Appreciation Club.

    Graduate student competition results, sponsored by the Gretchen Hill Appreciation Club.


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  • Shadow
    Apr
    01
    Foundation to sponsor symposium at JAM


    March 31, 2016 – A day-long “Triennial Growth Symposium” is being planned for the 2016 Joint Annual Meeting of the American Society of Animal Science (ASAS), the American Dairy Science Association® (ADSA), the Western Section of the American Society of Animal Science (WSASAS), and the Canadian Society of Animal Science (CSAS). The symposium is sponsored by the ASAS Foundation. 

    The 2016 JAM will be held in Salt Lake City, Utah, July 19-23.

    Speakers who will be part of the Triennial Growth Symposium on July 23 include:

    Dr. Brian Paul Dalrymple, CSIRO Agriculture Flagship (Australia), speaking on “Muscle gene expression patterns associated with differential intramuscular fat in cattle and markers for skeletal muscle growth rate and major cell types.”


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  • Shadow
    Mar
    28
    Former D.C. intern named Next Generation delegate


    March 28, 2016 – One of our 2015 ASAS science policy interns, Maci Lienemann, has been chosen as a Next Generation Delegate by The Chicago Council on Global Affairs. Lienemann, a senior at the University of Nebraska, Lincoln, was one of 19 undergraduate and graduate students worldwide to be selected to participate in the delegation.

    In 2015, Lienemann interned in the office of Senator Ben Sasse of Nebraska. Learn more about her D.C. internship here.

    Read this article in High Plains Journal to learn more about Lienemann being selected to participate in the Next Generation delegation.

     


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  • Shadow
    Mar
    28
    APLU unveils "Healthy Food Systems, Healthy People"


    By Wendy Powers-Schilling, ASAS Public Policy Committee

    March 28, 2016 – The recent release of the “Healthy Food Systems, Healthy People” initiative by the Association of Public and Land-Grant Universities (APLU) sets an agenda that is summarized by 5 goals: 1) Realign research and education approaches using a “systems thinking” model that treats human health as an interdisciplinary issue; 2) Identify the drivers of consumer behavior in relation to chronic disease and examine how information can be used to help consumers make better decisions; 3) Better understand the complex interrelationships of the food-human-gut-microbiome and its role in human health; 4) Broaden the definition of food quality to include the promotion of human health; and 5) Improve the lab-to-community pipeline to facilitate the dissemination of new knowledge that medical, public health, education, and Cooperative Extension professionals can use to promote human health and ameliorate the burden of chronic disease.

    Focusing on the first goal, there is clearly an emphasis within land grant universities on taking a more systems-based approach to food production to include the human health implications. This means better integration between Extension efforts directed toward agriculture production and those directed toward human health, e.g. Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program Education (SNAP-Ed) and greater funding for research, Extension and education programming represents a collaboration between agriculture colleges and colleges of medicine and public health. This approach is consistent with ASAS policy statements.

    The APLU report lays out an objective for enhanced partnering across sectors with an outcome of greater support for interdisciplinary teams. An additional objective identifies a reallocation of USDA-NIFA competitive and/or capacity funds to support integrated approaches to human health priorities. Both suggest a greater focus of traditional agriculture production work that clearly connects to human health impact. When considered in the context of proposed research budgets for FY17 (Please see the graphic below) it is imperative that animal scientists think differently about our work in order to maintain funding for laboratories and programs. As important as animal protein and products are in the global environment, it is hard to imagine that USDA research dollars are less than half that of any other agency, and less than 2 percent of the total R&D budget. Efforts to increase USDA-NIFA funding may have been beneficial but funding still pales in comparison to that available from other agencies. In order to take advantage of where funding is directed, one may need to re-think how they propose traditional production research and programming such that it conveys value and relevance to health directives, thus opening opportunities to sources of funding beyond USDA-NIFA.


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  • Shadow
    Mar
    28
    First Nutrition Research Roadmap released


    By Teresa Davis, ASAS Public Policy Committee

    March 28, 2016 – The Interagency Committee on Human Nutrition Research has released the first Nutrition Research Roadmap designed to guide federal nutrition research. The 2016-2021 National Nutrition Research Roadmap encourages an increased focus on research that can lead to more individualized advice for promoting health and preventing disease.The Roadmap is a cooperative effort between the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Department of Health and Human Services, Department of Defense, Department of Commerce, the Federal Trade Commission, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, the United States Agency for International Development, the Environmental Protection Agency, the Veterans Health Administration, and the White House Office of Science and Technology. The Roadmap emphasizes effective collaboration among these agencies as well as government, academia, and the private sector in promoting nutrition research.

    Three key questions that encompass a broad spectrum of research are identified in the National Nutrition Research Roadmap. They are:

    Within these three questions, eleven topical areas were identified based on population impact, feasibility, and emerging scientific opportunities. Research gaps and opportunities were identified and short-term and long-term initiatives were put forward.


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  • Shadow
    Mar
    28
    Snack and Fact: ASAS in action in D.C.


    By Deb Hamernik, ASAS Public Policy Committee

    March 28, 2016 – Several ASAS members recently participated in a Congressional Visits Day and hosted a Snack & Fact briefing in Washington, D.C.

    ASAS members Skip Bartol (Auburn University), Margaret Benson (Washington State University), Deb Hamernik (University of Nebraska), Alex Stelzleni (University of Georgia), and Cassie Welch (Iowa State University) participated in the Congressional Visits Day in Washington, D.C. during National Ag Week. Congressional Visits Day was organized by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America. More than 65 undergraduate and graduate students, academic scientists, and certified crop advisors participated in these events.

    On Monday, March 14, participants heard an update on funding opportunities from Sonny Ramaswamy (Director, USDA NIFA) and Sally Rockey (Executive Director, Foundation for Food and Agriculture Research).


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  • Shadow
    Mar
    28
    Greetings from D.C.


    By Jamee P. Bell, ASAS science policy intern

    March 28, 2016 – Since my last contribution, I have become much more comfortable in my position as an intern. The time in my office has flown by and before I know it, I will be approaching graduation at Tarleton State University!

    As I approach graduation, the question arises, “What are my plans post commencement?” What a loaded question that feels like! While the answer is still unbeknown to me, I am certain that my time on the Hill has prepared me well, thus far, to accomplish my vision of advocating for policies that truly benefit American agriculture.

    Meanwhile, I have begun a new, particularly complex, research assignment. While I was certain that this task might only take a week, it has proven to be much more challenging than I had anticipated. Not only am I becoming more knowledgeable about an area of agriculture that I was not very familiar with, I am also learning who and what resources are available to me. By utilizing these resources, I am learning how to interact with professionals at the top of their field and work with them efficiently to produce information or data that will help progress my current findings.


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  • Shadow
    Mar
    24
    Recap of Midwest Ruminant Nutrition Symposium


    By Chloe Mitchell, ASAS/ASAP communications intern

    March 24, 2016 – A Ruminant Nutrition Symposium was held last week at the 2016 Midwest Meeting in Des Moines. Symposium chair Phil Cardoso, of the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, welcomed attendees before introducing the first speaker, Nathan Pyatt.

    Pyatt presented “Veterinary Feed Directive (VFD) and its practical considerations for the beef industry.” He spoke on the recent changes being implemented by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration regarding the use of medicated feed and water for livestock. Pyatt outlined a number of medically important antibiotics that will require a VFD by January 2017 if they are to be fed to livestock in medicated feed. This means that the antibiotic cannot be used without authorization from a veterinarian with a valid veterinarian-client-patient-relationship (VCPR). Once a VFD is obtained, the antibiotics cannot be used off label or past the stipulated expiration date. The aim of these changes is for the use of drugs medically important to humans to be limited only to uses necessary for assurance of animal health, or responsible therapeutic use that includes veterinary oversight.

    The second speaker was Phillip Myer from the University of Tennessee, who presented “Gut Bacterial Communities and their Association with Production Parameters in Beef Cattle.” Myer spoke on recent improvements in production parameters in beef cattle, particularly feed efficiency, being attributed to the host genetics, nutrition, and animal management. He highlighted that the bacterial communities of the rumen and lower gastrointestinal tract are just as important for feed efficiency, and presented results from a recent study of the gastrointestinal tract microbial communities of steers, showing that minute changes in the numbers and taxa of microbes caused notable differences in average daily gain and other feed efficiency parameters of the host animal.


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  • Shadow
    Mar
    24
    Taking Stock Australia launches


    March 24, 2016 – The inaugural issue of Taking Stock Australia debuts March 25, 2016. Taking Stock Australia is a new monthly e-newsletter distributed to members of the Australian Society of Animal Production (ASAP).  The newsletter will provide the latest news, research, events and developments in animal production in Australia and globally.ASAP collaborated with ASAS to bring the newsletter to the ASAP membership and to demonstrate that animal science is a global industry with growing opportunities. As such, ASAP is now part of a global animal science community, including the U.S., Canada, New Zealand and Argentina.

    Our ASAP-sponsored communications interns, Chloe Mitchell and Holly Webb, have spent several weeks developing and writing content for the new newsletter. Visit the Taking Stock Australia website to see the inaugural articles!


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  • Shadow
    Mar
    24
    Researchers discover methane traits are heritable in beef cattle


    By Holly Webb and Chloe Mitchell, ASAS/ASAP communications interns

    March 24, 2016 – For the first time ever, researchers in Australia have discovered that methane emissions from beef cattle are a heritable trait. The milestone research, published online in the Journal of Animal Science, offers the potential for using genetic selection to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from cattle, without altering cattle performance.

    Ruminants contribute 80% of global livestock greenhouse gas emissions, and this is mainly through the production of methane. Methane is a by-product of microbial fermentation in the rumen. Methane emissions vary between cattle. An animal’s genetics may be partly responsible for this variation. Now, given this new research, genetics also could be part of the solution.

    “Genetic variation in methane emissions is present in beef cattle populations,” said corresponding author Dr. Paul Arthur, a beef geneticist at the New South Wales Department of Primary Industries in Australia. “There is potential to use genetic selection to reduce methane emissions.”


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