Featured Articles

  • Aug
    01
    Western Section names new officers


    August 1, 2016 – The Western Section of the American Society of Animal Science (WSASAS) announced its new Executive Committee officers at the annual meeting in Salt Lake City, Utah.


    We extend a warm welcome to the new WSASAS officers:

    President – Dr. Shanna Ivey, New Mexico State University

    President Elect – Dr. Connie Larson, Zinpro Corporation


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  • Aug
    01
    Northeastern Section Director announced


    August 1, 2016 – The Northeast Section of the American Society of Animal Science announced its new Section Director at the annual meeting in Salt Lake City, Utah. Dr. Kristen Govoni of the University of Connecticut will replace Dr. Thomas Hoagland, also of the University of Connecticut. We extend a warm welcome to Dr. Govoni and a special thank you to Dr. Hoagland for his years of service as Northeastern Section Director!

     


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  • Aug
    01
    JAM Graduate Student Symposium summary


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    By: Lucy Schroeder, ASAS Communications Intern

    August 1, 2016 – The American Society of Animal Science hosted their Graduate Student Symposium on Friday, July 22, at the 2016 Joint Annual Meeting (JAM) in Salt Lake City. This symposium focused on helping graduate students with achieving their career goals. The speaker line-up consisted of Dr. Ryan Yamka (Pet Food R&D Consultant), Dr. Michelle Calvo-Lornezo (Elanco Animal Health), Dr. Justin Crosswhite (North Dakota State University), and Dr. Joel Caton (North Dakota State University).




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  • Jul
    28
    New ASAS public policy statement


    July 28, 2016 – The American Society of Animal Science (ASAS)  has released an updated policy statement about preserving the benefits of antibiotics for people and animals. For your convenience, the text is provided here or you may view the pdf here: https://asas.org/membership-services/public-policy/policy-statements.

    Rationale

    Antibiotics and other antimicrobial agents are used widely against pathogens for protection of human and animal health. Production of sufficient safe and nutritious animal-sourced foods for human consumption is necessary for the security of the US and global food supply. To ensure this production and animal wellbeing, proper management of livestock includes appropriate use of vaccines, parasiticides, good handling and housing practices, and appropriate nutrition. These practices can reduce, but not eliminate, disease incidence. Prudent use of antimicrobial agents remains necessary for prevention, control, and treatment of infectious disease in food animals.

    Although microorganisms can naturally develop resistance to this class of drugs, concern about increasing incidence of drug resistance is growing among scientists, health professionals, and the public. Loss of effective antimicrobial therapies poses a potential threat to public health. As one outcome of these concerns, growth promotion and feed efficiency claims are voluntarily being removed from medically important feed-grade antibiotics. These antimicrobials will move from over-the counter to veterinary feed directive (VFD) 1 status. This change in labeling will require livestock producers to work closely with licensed veterinarians for authorized use of VFD antimicrobial drugs. Recommended guidelines for both producers and manufacturers have also been issued by the FDA2,3. To safeguard the effectiveness of antimicrobial therapies and reduce the emergence of drug resistant organisms, antimicrobial drugs must be used judiciously in both humans and animals, according to scientific evidence-based practices.


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  • Jul
    28
    Register for Innovate 2016


    July 28, 2016 – Join us at Madden’s on Gull Lake in Brainerd, Minn., for Innovate 2016, September 14-16!

    The theme of this year’s program is “Emerging Innovations in Animal Health: Strategies for a Healthier & More Sustainable Animal.”

    Register online today!

    View the Preliminary Schedule of Events


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  • Jul
    28
    News from ASAS Science Policy Interns


    July 28, 2016 – The ASAS Science Policy Internship is wrapping up for the 2016 season. Here are updates and summaries contributed by our five 2016 interns. Please take a moment to click on the links and see what our interns have been up to in Washington D.C.!

    Jamee Bell recaps D.C. internship

    ASAS Science Policy Intern: Alexandra Cantrell

    Update from ASAS Science Policy Intern: Morgan Jones


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  • Jul
    28
    Jamee Bell recaps D.C. internship




    My passion for agriculture began when I was just a freshman in high school. I was accepted into the James Madison Agriscience Magnet Program where I began to study agriculture. I went into college knowing what I wanted to study and had already gained four years of meaningful, hands-on, practice.

    Fast forward to completing my internships and earning a degree after studying agriculture for nearly ten years, I reflect on what prepared me to be successful in my internships and there are three things that immediately stand out to me: an ability to effectively communicate, an understanding of my field, and a willingness to continually learn. My predominant role as an ASAS Science Policy Intern was communication— communicating with leaders within the organization, with members, and readers. Within my congressional office, communicating well with office staff, members of congress, and especially constituents was a key aspect of performing well. What prepared me to communicate well with others, was my experience in customer service. A job as simple as managing the front desk at a water park resort taught me how to be patient, to ask the right questions to find solutions, and to have proper decorum. Another major aspect of interning for the American Society of Animal Science as a Science Policy Intern is understanding what major or current issues agriculturalists are facing and finding sources that you may continually refer to in order to remain informed.

    Although I spent a majority of my internship studying crop insurance rather than an animal science based issue, I was able to attend briefings and find resources that I could learn more from. In retrospect, I would have chosen an animal science related issue to follow throughout my internship and covered that issue in my previous editorials. However, most importantly, my foundation had been established and my willingness to learn was ever-present. Although crop insurance was not a familiar topic to me, the experience has diversified my agricultural knowledge and has taught me that there is more to agriculture than livestock.


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  • Jul
    28
    ASAS Policy Intern: Cordelia Hiers


    By Cordelia Hiers, ASAS Science Policy Intern


    July 28, 2016 – Every good dream contains hopes, goals, and aspirations, all of which fall subject to time. Starting at the age of eight years old I have dreamed of living in Washington D.C. In the past, when dwelling on my dream, I would have told you with certainty I was going to become a zoo veterinarian. I moved from dream to dream with fluidity from a zoo veterinarian, to a farrier, to an equine vet, as well considering equestrian management. My common ground: agriculture. It was not until later in my high school career that I discovered my fondness for the agriculture industry was irrevocable.

    Following high school graduation, I attended Murray State University in the state of unbridled spirit, Kentucky. The Hutson School of Agriculture at Murray State University consists of a small team of faculty and staff who are dedicated to fostering their students’ dreams. This group of faculty emphasizes an unmatched precedence in the future of their students and they harbored my ambitions.  I received my education both inside and outside of the classroom that set me on a curricular path toward my future career.

    I am proud to say that I have a received my Bachelor’s of Science in Agriculture with a minor in Political Science; a combination of my passion for agriculture and my desire to advocate on its behalf. Fourteen years later I am in Washington D.C. interning with Animal Agriculture Alliance, an organization dedicated to bridging the communication gap between farm and fork. Currently, I have just begun my second week with the Alliance and the experience thus far has proved to be invaluable.


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  • Jul
    26
    Dr. Evan Titgemeyer named ASAS Fellow


    By Jamie Hawley, ASAS Communications Intern

    July 28, 2016 – Dr. Evan Titgemeyer was named a recipient of the 2016 American Society of Animal Science (ASAS) Fellow Award: Research Category by the ASAS during its annual meeting in Salt Lake City, Utah.

    Dr. Titgemeyer earned his B.S. from The Ohio State University and his M.S. and Ph.D. from the University of Illinois. He joined the faculty at Kansas State University in 1992. His research program has been very productive as evidenced by 145 journal articles and over $2 million in research support. He served as a Division Editor for the Journal of Animal Science from 2006-2009 and currently serves as a Section Editor. He received the American Feed Industry Association Award in Ruminant Nutrition Research in 2007.

    Dr. Titgemeyer’s research program studies amino acid utilization by growing cattle and has demonstrated that the efficiencies of amino acid use for growth differ among the amino acids, and is often much less than predicted by current models. Eleven of his graduate students have been placed as university faculty. He currently serves as Graduate Program Director and Research Coordinator in the Department of Animal Sciences and Industry at Kansas State University.


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  • Jul
    26
    Providing expertise to media contacts


    By Dr. Wendy Powers, ASAS Public Policy Committee

    July 28, 2016 – From time to time, the American Society of Animal Science (ASAS) is contacted by the media seeking an expert to talk about a hot topic or issue. ASAS relies on its members to provide science-based information and maintains a list of scientists from around the U.S. to help respond to inquiries from the media. The ASAS Public Policy Committee is updating its Experts List. Please consider nominating colleagues to serve as an expert resource in any of the following areas: Animal Well Being, Genetic Engineering, Meat Science, Antibiotic Use in Animal Production, Sustainable Agriculture, Animal Science in Zoos, Livestock in Developing Countries, and Pet Care. Self-nominations are encouraged. Because the goal is to connect members of the media to the most current science, experts do not need to be members of ASAS but do need to be active in the discipline area for which they are nominated.

    Please send your nominations (name, area of expertise, email address and phone number) to Kim Schoonmaker (Kims@asas.org). Nominations will be reviewed, quarterly, by the ASAS Public Policy Committee and all nominees contacted prior to listing on the ASAS website.


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  • Jul
    26
    ASAS Science Policy Intern: Olivia Woods


    By: Olivia Woods, ASAS Science Policy Summer Intern



    July 28, 2016 – Coming directly from a quiet college town in Western Oregon, the pace and intensity of Washington D.C. initially took me by surprise. During my first week on Capitol Hill, I learned the basics of working in a congressional office very rapidly. This is where my previous professional and administrative skills came in handy. On any given day in the office, I am expected to read and file incoming emails, field phone calls, or voicemails from hundreds of constituents, then tally their various opinions for the office’s daily report.

    In addition to these administrative tasks, I am trained to give guided tours of the Capitol building to interested constituents.  Although an intimidating prospect at first, these tours quickly became one of my favorite parts of the job because they provide the opportunity for me to get out of the office, stretch my legs, and meet some new people.


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  • Jul
    26
    ASAS Science Policy Intern: Alexandra Cantrell


    By: Alexandra Cantrell, ASAS Science Policy Summer Intern

    July 28, 2016 – After spending two months in Washington D.C. I have come to love the rich history of the city itself and the impact that the people living in this district can have on the world. I always knew that Capitol Hill dictated the way our country is run, but it did not truly resonate with me until I started touring the halls of our government buildings. I now understand that our nation’s capital has a profound effect on our culture and the way our society thinks. My first realization of this was in the Supreme Court building, which showcases the history of our past justices. To portray the development of law, throughout the building there are friezes of different philosophers and great lawgivers of history such as Moses, Aristotle, and Chief Justice John Marshall.

    Another exhibit that caught my eye was the showcase of Justice Sandra Day O’Connor. I had the opportunity to meet her once when she attended the opening of the Cowgirl Hall of Fame in Fort Worth. It was great to have a chance to learn about her in more detail. As a fellow Texan, rancher, and woman, she inspired me with her dedication to the law. Even though she was probably not an Animal Science major, I consider her a role model for what people in agriculture can accomplish in government and policy.

    Under the checks and balances within our government, the legislative branch is intended to make the laws, the executive branch is meant to enforce the laws, and the judicial branch must interpret the laws set by the government. Many of the cases heard by the Supreme Court over the course of our history have shaped who we are as a nation today and it humbled me to walk through the displays within the building.


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  • Jul
    26
    ASAS Science Policy Internship: Morgan Jones


    By: Morgan Jones, ASAS Science Policy Summer Intern

    July 28, 2016 – Hello! My name is Morgan Jones and I am currently in the ASAS Summer Policy Internship Program interning under South Dakota Representative Kristi Noem and South Dakota Senator John Thune in Washington D.C. My legislatures have gone above and beyond for the farmers and ranchers of my state, which is important when your state has four cows for every one person.

    Being born and raised in Milbank, South Dakota, agriculture has had a large impact on my life. It is my hope that one day I can contribute to this industry. I currently attend the University of Minnesota and am working towards a major in Animal Science with a Pre-Veterinary emphasis and minors in Political Science and Public Health. Although my ultimate goal is to become a veterinarian, I have always been curious about the policies and laws affecting animal science. This interest led me to shadow Dr. Oedekoven, South Dakota’s State Veterinarian, to see how these two passions could be combined.

    My experience in Washington D.C. has gone above and beyond my expectations. My first week at the capitol I attended a House Agricultural Committee hearing and ended up sitting next to a lobbyist from the American Veterinary Medical Association. I have also gained valuable legislative knowledge, in addition to connecting with South Dakota constituents. I look forward  to what the rest of my internship entails!


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  • Jul
    25
    Rosa awarded Rockefeller Prentice Award


    By Jamie Hawley, ASAS Communications Intern

    July 25,2016 – Dr. Guilherme J. M. Rosa was named the recipient of the 2016 American Society of Animal Science (ASAS) Rockefeller Prentice Award in Animal Breeding and Genetics by the ASAS during its annual meeting in Salt Lake City, Utah.
    Dr. Rosa is a Professor of Quantitative Genetics and Genomics in the Department of Animal Sciences at the University of Wisconsin (UW)-Madison, and has previously served as faculty in the Department of Biostatistics at São Paulo State University, Brazil, and in the Department of Animal Science at Michigan State University. He has a B.S. in Animal Science and M.S. in Animal Breeding and Genetics from São Paulo State University, Brazil. In addition, he has a Ph.D. degree in Statistics and Agricultural Experimentation from the University of São Paulo, Brazil, and a post-doctoral training at UW-Madison.

    Dr. Rosa conducts basic research in the areas of experimental design, statistical modeling, and data mining techniques applied to animal breeding and quantitative genetics/genomics. Moreover, Dr. Rosa maintains a very active collaborative research program in genetics and genomics of various species including cattle, pigs, sheep, and chickens.

    The ASAS Rockefeller Prentice Award in Animal Breeding and Genetics stimulates research excellence in breeding and genetics. The research upon which the award is based is original and on basic or applied research in breeding and genetics with any class of large or small animals. The ASAS Rockefeller Prentice Memorial Award in Animal Breeding and Genetics is sponsored by ABS Global, Inc.


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  • Jul
    25
    Crenshaw awarded Cromwell Award for Research in Mineral Nutrition


    By Jamie Hawley, ASAS Communications Intern

    July 25, 2016 – Dr. Thomas D. Crenshaw was named the recipient of the 2016 American Society of Animal Science (ASAS) Gary L. Cromwell Award for Research in Mineral Nutrition by the ASAS during its annual meeting in Salt Lake City, Utah.

    Dr. Crenshaw is a professor in the Department of Animal Sciences at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. He received Ph.D. and M.S. degrees at the University of Nebraska in Swine Nutrition and a B.S. degree in Animal Sciences at the University of Tennessee-Martin.

    Two main themes have persisted throughout Dr. Crenshaw’s research in mineral nutrition related to skeletal growth. These include the roles of cation-anion balance and nutritional factors which enhance bone integrity. His research has allowed strong ties with researchers in academia and the commercial swine industry, and importantly, the projects have provided opportunities to train both graduate and undergraduate students. He has provided major input as mentor for 20 M.S. and 10 Ph.D. degree programs.


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  • Jul
    25
    Welsh awarded Animal Physiology and Endocrinology Award


    By Jamie Hawley, ASAS Communications Intern

    July 25, 2016 – Dr. Thomas H. Welsh, Jr. was named the recipient of the 2016 American Society of Animal Science (ASAS) Animal Physiology and Endocrinology Award by the ASAS during its annual meeting in Salt Lake City, Utah.


    Dr. Welsh was born at Ft. Bragg, NC. He attended Texas A&M University (TAMU), and then transferred to North Carolina State University where he earned a B.S. (Animal Science, 1974) and Ph.D. (Physiology/Biochemistry, 1980; mentored by Drs. Bryan Johnson and Lester Ulberg) degrees. From 1980-83, Dr. Welsh was a Reproductive Endocrinology postdoctoral scholar in Dr. Aaron Hsueh’s lab at the University of California-San Diego. In 1983, Dr. Welsh joined the faculty at TAMU where he is now a Professor and AgriLife Research Faculty Fellow in the Departments of Animal Science and Veterinary Integrative Biosciences.

    Dr. Welsh and colleagues support their students and projects with funding from intramural and extramural sources. His Endocrine Physiology Laboratory studies how stress and temperament are linked to reproductive, metabolic, and immune functions. He has served on over 130 graduate advisory committees and has been chair/co-chair for 26 M.S. and 11 Ph.D. students. Since 2006, Dr. Welsh has authored or co-authored 4 book chapters, 64 peer-reviewed journal articles, 146 abstracts, 8 position papers and essays, and 51 technical reports. Dr. Welsh is married to Claudia Barton, D.V.M. (TAMU veterinary oncology professor) and they have 2 daughters, Laura (professional equestrian) and Julia (TAMU nursing student).


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  • Jul
    25
    Reynolds awarded ASAS Fellow: Research Category


    By Jamie Hawley, ASAS Communications Intern

    July 25, 2016 – Dr. Larry P. Reynolds was named a recipient of the 2016 American Society of Animal Science (ASAS) Fellow Award: Research Category by the ASAS during its annual meeting in Salt Lake City, Utah.

    Dr. Reynolds’ research career has focused on improving both fertility (i.e., the ability to conceive and to establish a pregnancy) and pregnancy outcomes (i.e., healthy offspring) in livestock. These problems have major scientific, socioeconomic, and health implications for humans as well.

    Along with numerous collaborators, Dr. Reynolds helped establish the importance of placental vascular growth and blood flow to placental function. They also developed methods to evaluate the rate of cell turnover in vivo. More recently, Dr. Reynolds and colleagues have shown that altered placental vascular development and function are mediators by which maternal stressors, such as malnutrition, environmental factors, and assisted reproductive technologies, ‘program’ pre- and postnatal well-being and productivity.


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  • Jul
    25
    ASAS staff out of office




    July 25, 2016 – Several of our American Society of Animal Science staff members are still in Salt Lake City facilitating the International Society for Animal Genetics (ISAG) Conference. Please note that this may result in a delay in returning calls and emails to the ASAS office. Thank you for your patience!


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  • Jul
    25
    New board members named at ASAS business meeting


    July 25, 2016 – The American Society of Animal Science (ASAS) announced its new President-Elect, three new Directors-at-Large, and new Graduate Director during the society’s business meeting in Salt Lake City, Utah.



    Your new ASAS board members are:

    President-Elect – Dr. Steven A. Zinn, University of Connecticut


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  • Jul
    25
    ASN competition winners




    July 25, 2016 – The American Society for Nutrition (ASN) Student Competition was sponsored by Biomin. The competition took place during the 2016 Joint Annual Meeting of the ASAS-ADSA®-CSAS-WSASAS, held last week in Salt Lake City, Utah. Here are the competition winners.

    1st – Abstract #440 – The Development of a Cecum-Cannulated Gnotobiotic Piglet Model to Study the Human Gut Microbiota, Nirosh Aluthge, University of Nebraska

    2nd – Abstract #814 – Effect of Starch Source in Pelleted Concentrates on Fecal Bacterial Communities in Thoroughbred Mares, Morgan Pyles, University of Kentucky


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