Featured Articles

  • Shadow
    Feb
    08
    Southern Section convenes in San Antonio


    February 8, 2016 – The first of the 2016 ASAS sectional meetings kicked off this weekend in San Antonio, Texas. Yesterday’s program at the 2016 ASAS Southern Section Meeting included an Academic Quadrathlon (AQ) competition and a standing-room-only cow-calf symposium.


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  • Shadow
    Feb
    08
    Texas A&M tops Southern Section AQ


    February 8, 2016 – Congratulations to the undergraduate team from Texas A&M University! The team took top honors at the Southern Section Academic Quadrathlon, held in conjunction with the 2016 ASAS Southern Section Annual Meeting in San Antonio, Texas. Winning team members include Sierra Francis, Logan Speck, Erika Wiggs and Madelyn Wilson.

    Second place went to Louisiana State University, followed by the University of Arkansas in third place. Hats off to all 10 teams in this year’s competition!

    Colleges represented at this year’s competition included the University of Tennessee, Oklahoma State University, Louisiana State University, Texas A&M University, Auburn University, Tuskegee University, the University of Georgia, Mississippi State University, the University of Arkansas, Texas Tech University, and Berry College.

    The teams completed lab practicum events and written exams at Texas A&M University in College Station on Sat., Feb. 6. The competition moved to San Antonio on Sun., Feb. 7, where the teams gave oral presentations and competed in a quiz bowl competition.


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  • Shadow
    Feb
    08
    Meet our Australian interns


    February 8, 2016 – ASAS welcomed two communications interns from Australia this month. Please join us in welcoming Holly Webb and Chloe Mitchell! 

    Holly (shown at left in photo) and Chloe (at right in photo) will be working on several communications projects, as well as establishing an electronic newsletter for the membership of the Australian Society of Animal Production (ASAP). Please take a minute to read about their academic backgrounds and plans during their stay in the U.S.

    My name is Holly Webb and I will be an intern at ASAS from February to April 2016. I received a scholarship from the American Society of Animal Science (ASAS) in a joint initiative with the Australian Society of Animal Production (ASAP) to work as a communications intern at the ASAS headquarters in Champaign, IL.

    I am from Sydney, Australia and completed my undergraduate degree at The University of Sydney. I completed a Bachelor of Animal and Veterinary Bioscience in 2015, graduating with Honours Class 1 after completing an individual research project. I have a range of interests including animal behaviour and welfare, as well as livestock production and wildlife management. I am looking forward to the events ASAS has organised over the next 10 weeks, in particular attending the 2016 Midwest Meeting in Des Moines, IA.


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  • Shadow
    Feb
    05
    Top 10 most downloaded JAS articles of 2015


    February 4, 2016 – We have compiled a list of the top 10 most downloaded articles published in the Journal of Animal Science in 2015. The articles are listed by title, followed by the number of full-text downloads in parentheses. What were the most cited articles in 2015? Find out here! 

    INVITED REVIEW: Evolution of meat animal growth research during the past 50 years: Adipose and muscle stem cells. M. V. Dodson, R. E. Allen, M. Du, W. G. Bergen, S. G. Velleman, S. P. Poulos, M. Fernyhough-Culver, M. B. Wheeler, S. K. Duckett, M. R. I. Young, B. H. Voy, Z. Jiang and G. J. Hausman. Journal of Animal Science  2015 93: 2: 457-481
    doi:10.2527/jas.2014-8221                       (912)

    Genetic parameters for predicted methane production and laser methane detector measurements. N. K. Pickering, M. G. G. Chagunda, G. Banos, R. Mrode, J. C. McEwan and E. Wall. Journal of Animal Science  2015 93: 1: 11-20
    doi:10.2527/jas.2014-8302                       (850)

    Sow and litter factors influencing colostrum yield and nutritional composition. I. Declerck, J. Dewulf, S. Piepers, R. Decaluwé and D. Maes. Journal of Animal Science  2015 93: 3: 1309-1317
    doi:10.2527/jas.2014-8282                       (709)


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  • Shadow
    Feb
    05
    New JAS section coming soon


    JASjan2016cover
    February 4, 2016 – A new section is being added to the Journal of Animal Science to allow rapid communication of research considered novel and highly significant to animal science.

    Submitted papers should follow JAS guidelines, but are restricted to two figures or tables or a combination. The final published paper will be no more than 5 pages.

    A JAS Section Editor will handle the review, and the paper will be either accepted or rejected. Reviews will generally be complete within two weeks. If accepted, the paper will be added to the “First Look” section within two days and placed in the next available journal issue. If significant revisions are needed, the Section Editor will reject the manuscript and require a new submission. Generally, there will not be a revision. All papers are subject to the $100 submission fee (applied toward publication if accepted). The manuscript will be published open access and the fee for publication of this rapid format will be $1,000 (members) and $2,000 (non-members).

    The link for the new publication format will be available in two weeks. Until then, please submit papers as a Special Topics paper and inform the editor that the paper is being submitted for the new rapid communications section.


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  • Shadow
    Feb
    05
    Top 10 most cited JAS articles of 2015


    jasNov15cover
    February 4, 2016 – Here is a list of the top 10 most cited articles published in the Journal of Animal Science in 2015. What were the most downloaded articles in 2015? Find out here!

    Effects of in utero heat stress on postnatal body composition in pigs: I. Growing phase.  Johnson, J. S.; Fernandez, M. V. Sanz; Gutierrez, N. A.; Patience, J. F.; Ross, J. W.; Gabler, N. K.; Lucy, M. C.; Safranski, T. J.; Rhoads, R. P.; Baumgard, L. H.  JAN 2015  71-81. 10.2527/jas2014-8354

    Effects of in utero heat stress on postnatal body composition in pigs: II. Finishing phase.  Johnson, J. S.; Fernandez, M. V. Sanz; Patience, J. F.; Ross, J. W.; Gabler, N. K.; Lucy, M. C.; Safranski, T. J.; Rhoads, R. P.; Baumgard, L. H.  JAN 2015  82- 92. 10.2527/jas2014-8355

    RUMINANT NUTRITION SYMPOSIUM: Use of genomics and transcriptomics to identify strategies to lower ruminal methanogenesis. McAllister, T. A.; Meale, S. J.; Valle, E.; Guan, L. L.; Zhou, M.; Kelly, W. J.; Henderson, G.; Attwood, G. T.; Janssen, P. H.  APR 2015  1431-1449.  10.2527/jas2014-8329


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  • Shadow
    Feb
    05
    Global Food Security symposium coming up


    February 4, 2016 – The Global Food Security Consortium (GFSC) and the Seed Science Center at Iowa State University (ISU) will welcome experts from around the world to discuss the components necessary for addressing global food and nutrition security in an upcoming symposium entitled “REAL Sustainability.”

    The April 13-14 symposium, to be held in the Scheman Building at the Iowa State Center in Ames, Iowa, will offer three sessions on the topics of global food security and agricultural sustainability research; meeting education demands of the agricultural industry; and capacity building through public-private partnerships. Symposium speakers include William Dar, Inanglupa Movement, Inc.; Christie Vilsack, United States Agency for International Development; Jocelyn Brown, United States Department of Agriculture – Foreign Agriculture Service; and Patricia Sheikh, Corporate Council of Africa.

    A research poster presentation and competition will be held for undergraduate and graduate students. Research posters from all disciplines related to global food and nutrition security are welcome, and monetary awards will be presented for the top three posters.

    For a detailed program agenda, full list of speakers and poster abstract submission information, visit http://register.extension.iastate.edu/2016globalfoods.


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  • Shadow
    Feb
    02
    2016 national awards nominations now open


    February 1, 2016 – ASAS is pleased to announce that the 2016 ASAS National Awards are now open for nominations. The ASAS Awards Program is set up to honor the most significant contributions of our members to Animal Science, Animal Agriculture and to ASAS. Award nominations are due March 7, 2016.The National Awards are one of our favorite programs in the office, because the awards honor our history, celebrate our membership and help us to glimpse the future. Here are a few things about the ASAS National Awards Program that you might not know:

    Please nominate your colleagues for the 2016 ASAS National Awards.
 If you would like to re-nominate a colleague from a previous nomination, please email Jacelyn at: JacelynH@asas.org.

    ASAS National Award nominations are due March 7, 2016.


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  • Shadow
    Feb
    01
    Renowned animal scientists receive John J. Carty Award




    Read more about the award recipients here.


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  • Shadow
    Feb
    01
    2016 PORK 101 date set


    February 1, 2016 – The American Meat Science Association (AMSA) is excited to announce that the 2016 Texas A&M University PORK 101 course will be held June 1-3 in College Station, Texas. PORK 101 is hosted by AMSA in cooperation with the National Pork Board and is sponsored by Elanco Animal Health and Merck Animal Health.

    Attendees will experience firsthand the selection, evaluation and fabrication of pork carcasses, as well as the importance of hog handling, grading, food safety and much more. The course concludes with attendees preparing and sampling products from pork carcasses including pumped loins, bacon, hams and sausage.

    Attendees will have the opportunity to learn about the value differences in swine, pork carcasses, pork primals and processed pork products from meat science faculty and AMSA members.

    The program features:


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  • Shadow
    Feb
    01
    Call for proposals


    February 1, 2016 – The U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) Science and Technology Directorate Agriculture Defense Branch has recently released a call for proposals related to the susceptibility of North American wildlife species to foreign animal diseases and zoonotic diseases deemed tier two and three by the U.S. Department of Agriculture.

    This call for proposals aims to provide gap analyses and inform potential future projects. Additional information is sought for surveillance mythologies, diagnostic samples, testing and disease countermeasures used in wildlife specie. DHS also seeks information regarding vector competence of North American arthropod species for High Consequence or Transboundary Foreign Animal Diseases and information on other diseases of wildlife with economic importance to agriculture or aquaculture.

    More information on this call for proposals can be found here.


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  • Shadow
    Jan
    29
    2015: Pivotal year for achieving nutritional security


    By Dr. Clint Krehbiel, ASAS Public Policy Committee

    January 28, 2016 – Congress has passed the Fiscal Year 2016 spending bill, which provides funding to address the challenge of ensuring nutritional security in the context of continued population growth, climate change, diminishing land and water resources, and the need to ensure public and economic health.

    In a recent email sent to U.S. Agricultural Experiment Station Directors, Dr. Sonny Ramaswamy, Director of the USDA’s National Institute of Food and Agriculture, highlighted how investments continue to catalyze exemplary and relevant research, education, and extension toward the goal of ensuring nutritional security. A few of those highlights included: The Northwest Advanced Renewable Alliance, led by Washington State University; the Food Insecurity Nutrition Incentive Program providing incentives at the point of purchase for Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program participants to purchase more fruits and vegetables; New Mexico Highlands University’s Achieving in Research Math and Science; the multi-institutional Triticeae (Barley & Wheat) Coordinated Agricultural Project; and the International Wheat Yield Partnership Program, established in coordination with partners in the United Kingdom, Australia, Mexico, India, Canada, France, along with USAID, and USDA-ARS. Another success story highlighted by Dr. Ramaswamy included the Beginning Farmers and Ranchers Development Program, which funded seven projects to serve veterans’ needs, including projects led by the Farmer Veteran Coalition, Arcadia Food, Kentucky State University, Cornell, and the University of Arkansas.

    Surprisingly, Dr. Ramaswamy did not include examples from animal science in his list of NIFA highlights. As a community of scientists, we are very excited about the aforementioned success stories. We are also proud of the contributions that animal scientists are making toward nutritional security. A few examples of NIFA-funded projects in animal science not highlighted by Dr. Ramaswamy include: Improving Nutrient Utilization and Feed Efficiency through Research and Extension to Enhance Pig Industry Sustainability and Competitiveness, led by Iowa State University; Genomic Selection and Herd Management for Improved Feed Efficiency of the Dairy Industry, led by Michigan State University; the University of Missouri-led National Program for Genetic Improvement of Feed Efficiency in Beef Cattle; Integrated Program for Reducing Bovine Respiratory Disease Complex in Beef and Dairy Cattle, led by Texas A&M; and Washington State University’s Improving Fertility of Dairy Cattle using Translational Genomics.


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  • Shadow
    Jan
    28
    New tool approved for use with EQIP planning


    By Dr. Shawn Archibeque and Dr. Wendy Powers-Schilling, ASAS Public Policy Committee

    January 28, 2016 – The National Air Quality Site Assessment Tool (NAQSAT) was developed through the collaboration of more than 12 land grant universities and numerous industry partners. The NAQSAT was developed for livestock producers, their advisors, and conservation planners to identify opportunities for addressing air emissions from confinement-based livestock and poultry operations. It provides assistance to livestock and poultry producers at confined animal operations in determining areas within their operations where opportunities exist to make changes that result in reduced air emissions. Use of NAQSAT is applicable for the following animal species:

    NAQSAT is based on the most accurate, credible data currently available regarding mitigation strategies for emissions of ammonia, methane, volatile organic compounds, hydrogen sulfide, particulate matter, odor, and nitrous oxide from livestock and poultry confined animal operations. NAQSAT development included funding from two NRCS (Natural Resources Conservation Service) conservation innovation grants. One of the greatest benefits of NAQSAT is that it allows users to identify concomitant changes associated with changing management practices, which may help to alleviate many unintended consequences.

    Recently, the USDA NRCS released a National Instruction that indicated the NAQSAT would need to be a part of the Environmental Quality Incentives Program (EQIP) planning process for livestock or poultry operations with 300 or more animal units to determine potential air-quality resource concerns at the operation.


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  • Shadow
    Jan
    28
    Funding of non-ag research in FY 2016


    By ASAS Public Policy Committee



    The budget for the National Institutes of Health is set at $32.1 billion, a 6.65% increase over 2015 funding. Francis S. Collins, Director of NIH called this NIH budget, “the most encouraging budget outcome in 12 years.” This includes a big boost for Alzheimer’s disease research (from $586 to $936 million) and an increase of $100 million to National Institute for Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) for antimicrobial resistance research.

    The 2016 research budget for the National Science Foundation is set at $6.033 billion, a 1.67% increase over 2015. Language in the bill requires that NSF projects describe how they serve the national interest with periodic updates to the Congressional Appropriations committees on this issue. Also included in the NSF budget is $880 million for Education and Human Resources (EHR) activities, including $35 million for the Historically Black Colleges and Universities Program, $14 million for the Tribal Colleges and Universities Program, and $62.5 million for the Advanced Informal STEM Learning program. $200.3 million was allocated to the Major Research Equipment and Facilities Constructions account for NSF, just under the FY 15 appropriated level, but was at the requested level. Included with that is the requirement that NSF submit an independent assessment of a revised cost estimate to complete and maintain the National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON). One NSF program area that did not receive a funding increase was the Social, Behavioral and Economic Sciences, which cannot surpass fiscal year 2015 funding levels.


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  • Shadow
    Jan
    28
    Environmental stewardship policy statement updated


    January 28, 2016 – An ASAS policy statement regarding the “Co-promotion of Environmental Stewardship and Production Efficiency” has been updated. It joins a list of several other policy statements updated by members of the ASAS Public Policy Committee.

    Access all of the ASAS Public Policy statements here.


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  • Shadow
    Jan
    26
    Viewpoints shared on proposed changes to bylaws


    January 25, 2016 – This article summarizes conversations with Dr. Michael Looper, ASAS President, and Dr. Peter Hansen, Distinguished Professor in the Department of Animal Sciences at the University of Florida, concerning a petition requesting changes to the ASAS Constitution and Bylaws. The petition, submitted to the ASAS Board of Directors in December 2015, calls for changes in ASAS board composition, leadership and governance.

    This article provides a forum for Dr. Looper and Dr. Hansen to address the ASAS membership and present the viewpoints of both the ASAS Board of Directors and the petitioners associated with the proposed bylaws changes.

    The petition containing the proposed amendments to the ASAS Constitution and Bylaws will be sent electronically to ASAS members on Tuesday, January 26, 2016.

    During an interview with Kim Schoonmaker, ASAS Scientific Communications Associate, Dr. Hansen explained the rationale for the four amendments to the ASAS bylaws, as outlined in the petition.


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  • Shadow
    Jan
    25
    ASAS invites ADSA to form annual meeting committee


    January 25, 2016 – Today Dr. Mike Looper, ASAS President, sent ADSA an invitation to form a committee to work with the ASAS Annual Meeting Strategic Planning Committee toward creating a co-located ASAS-ADSA meeting in 2021. The invitation was in response to ongoing conversations between ASAS and ADSA concerning a co-located meeting in 2021 and in response to an ADSA request for ASAS to join an ADSA-appointed JAM study committee.

    Please note, ASAS declined to participate in the “JAM” study group as proposed by ADSA for the following reasons:

    In order to move forward, ASAS is in the process of appointing the committee described by the ASAS Board of Directors to the membership in the second “JAM vote.” The annual meeting strategic planning committee will be composed of ASAS members (Board members and ASAS members that are not on the Board). Criteria for service on this committee will include: 1) JAM/ASAS annual meeting attendance a minimum of 3 of the last 5 years, 2) a minimum of 5 consecutive years of ASAS membership, and 3) service on at least 1 JAM/ASAS annual meeting program committee in the last 5 years. If ADSA opts to plan a co-located meeting with ASAS in 2021, they are invited to impanel their own committee with their committee structure and these two committees will work together.

    In order to facilitate a quick decision concerning a 2021 co-located meeting, ASAS is willing to concede the following pieces of the process to ADSA:


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  • Shadow
    Jan
    25
    Nominations for national awards to open February 1


    January 25, 2016 – Based on member requests from last year, ASAS has delayed opening nominations for National Awards so that the deadlines fit better with the academic calendar. Therefore, National Awards nominations will open on February 1, 2016 and close on March 7, 2016.

    Reviews for these awards occur March 7–18, 2016. The week of March 21-25, 2016, will serve as an extra review week for awards that have ties or too few reviews to determine a clear recipient. Recipients for all awards will be notified by March 28, 2016.

    Thank you for your understanding as we try to determine a schedule that best fits the needs of the membership.

    Photo: Dr. Carey Williams (left) accepts the Equine Science Award at the ASAS Awards Program in July 2015. She is pictured with Dr. Connie Larson of Zinpro Corporation, the award sponsor.


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  • Shadow
    Jan
    21
    Got any urban students?


    Students
    January 21, 2016 – Only 35% of animal science undergraduate students come from an ag background. Learn how to enhance communication with non-ag students during an “urban students” symposium at this year’s Joint Annual Meeting in Salt Lake City. Here’s a sneak peek at the topics and speakers.

    Symposium Title: Urban Students Symposium

    Section: Horse Species

    Topics and speakers include:


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  • Shadow
    Jan
    19
    Call for nominations for ASAS Board and committees


    January 18, 2016 – ASAS is beginning to populate the 2016-2017 Board of Directors, 2016-2017 Committees and 2017 Program Committees. Nominations for open board and committee positions are due February 8.

    Most board positions are 3-year terms and are elected by the membership (Sectional directors are elected by the sections, JAS Editor-in-Chief is appointed, and Foundation Chair is elected by the Foundation). Leadership positions open in 2016-2017 include:

    President-Elect

    3 Director-At-Large Positions


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