Featured Articles

  • Jul
    11
    New interpretive summary from July Animal Frontiers


    By Lucy Schroeder, ASAS Communications Intern



    July 11, 2016 – For over sixty years, it has been known that treating livestock with low doses of antibiotics can increase growth rate. In recent years, using antibiotics in this way has become a controversial topic, with critics concerned about the effect it may have on the development of antibiotic-resistant bacteria important in human medicine. As a result, it is important to understand how the microbiota play a role in digestion so we better understand how to achieve efficient weight gain in livestock.

    Dr. Laura M. Cox of Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Harvard Medical School examined the effects of antibiotic use on gut microbes and weight gain in different species. She has observed that the effectiveness of low-dose antibiotic use in animals can be influenced by what age the animal receives the treatment, the variety of the animal’s diet, and the length of the animal’s growth cycle.


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  • Jul
    11
    July 2016 issue of Jr. Animal Scientist published


     July 11, 2016 – The July issue of Jr. Animal Scientist is on the way to our Jr. Animal Scientist members! This month’s issue is all about “Animal Efficiency” and explores different aspects of efficiency in animals including feed conversion ratios, animal products, and edible insects.

    A special thank you goes out to the contributors for this issue: Anna Peterson, North Dakota State University, with guidance from Dr. Kim Vonnahme.

    If you know a child or classroom that would benefit from a subscription, sign them up today! Individual, family and group memberships are available.

    Visit AnimalSmart.org


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  • Jul
    11
    2016 JAM events


    July 11, 2016 – Looking for more fun and interesting things to do at the 2016 Joint Annual Meeting (JAM) in Salt Lake City? Check out the special events offered for all ages!

    Opening BBQ

    In This is the Place, you can take a step back in time to see the West as it was in the early settlement of Utah. In addition to the fascinating historic surroundings to explore, we will have traditional BBQ games that all ages can delight in. As a special treat, you can enjoy our cowboy entertainers singing and performing trick roping, and even have a chance to try some ropin’ of your own! We will also have the Big Scoop ice cream competition along with the Battle of the Brats competition to see who is a true BBQ champ.

    The BBQ will coincide with the launch of the JAM Instagram account instagram.com/2016jointannualmeeing/, hashtag #2016jam and a challenge to those attending the JAM Opening BBQ to post their cutest, silliest pictures using the hashtag #2016jambbq. The Instagrammer whose picture receives the most likes will win a gift bag containing great American Society of Animal Science (ASAS) items.


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  • Jul
    09
    Join us for the 2016 JAM


    JAM 2016



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  • Jul
    09
    CSAS events at 2016 JAM


    CSAS_Logo



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  • Jul
    09
    2016 JAM program and abstract books online


    JAM 2016
    Conference information and the scientific program for the 2016 Joint Annual Meeting (JAM) are at your fingertips in the JAM Program. The 2016 JAM Abstract Book also is now available online.

    The program has everything you need to plan your time in Salt Lake City, Utah, including:

    General meeting information, a transportation schedule, sightseeing options, hotel information, special events, pre- and post-conference events, an exhibit directory, maps, meeting and award sponsors, oral and poster scientific sessions, and more.

    While you’re at JAM, keep up-to-date with the 2016 JAM app! Create a personalized schedule, browse abstracts, view maps of the meeting locations, receive special announcement notifications, and more!


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  • Jul
    09
    Events for students at JAM





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  • Jul
    09
    In memory: Dr. James Clarence Rennie


    The following article is a tribute to Dr. James Clarence Rennie, who passed away June 23, 2016.

    Dr. Clare Rennie passed away on June 23, 2016, at the age of 90. He will be remembered by his many students and colleagues at the University of Guelph, in the Government of Ontario, and in Semex Alliance and by the farming public, for his friendship, his leadership, and his service to mankind. Dr. Rennie also was a devoted member of the Canadian Society of Animal Science throughout his career.

    Clare studied at Guelph obtaining a Bachelor in Science, then studied at Iowa State for a Masters and Ph.D. He married his wife Shirley, and they were together for 64 years. He returned to Guelph where he taught, led research in dairy genetics and founded the first IBM computer lab on the Guelph campus, analysing production and conformation data for dairy sire evaluation, and leading in livestock improvement. As Chair of the Department of Animal Science, he recruited talented scientists and established them in a newly developed building, forming the base for one of the most influential Animal Science Centres in the world.

    A builder of immense energy, Clare was instrumental in establishing the Elora Research Centre and the Arkell Swine Centre. After 22 years of service at the University, Clare became Assistant Deputy Minister of Agriculture, where he led the development of Agricultural Education Centres at the diploma level throughout Ontario, and played a major role in research direction in Ontario and Canada. He was particularly energetic in developing the Vineland and Elora Research Centres, and was in demand world wide as a speaker on science and education.


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  • Jul
    08
    CSAS symposium to focus on reducing livestock antibiotic use





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  • Jul
    08
    Call for abstracts for 2016 Western Nutrition Conference




    Each graduate student who wishes to present his/her own research at the competition is encouraged to submit one abstract. If you would like to present a poster at the conference, please send your abstract electronically (in Microsoft Word or a compatible word processing program) to Dr. Peiqiang Yu, Department of Animal Science, University of Saskatchewan at peiqiang.yu@usask.ca and zyn847@mail.usask.ca on or before August 1, 2016, to facilitate publication of submitted abstracts in the conference proceedings. Each student submitting an abstract MUST be registered for the conference. Please visit the conference website, http://www.anacan.org/en/news-events/events/2016-western-nutrition-conference for registration information.

    Abstracts will be published in the conference proceedings. Due to space limitations in the proceedings, abstracts cannot exceed a maximum of 2,300 keystrokes (including characters, spaces, and punctuation). Begin the count at the title and end the count with the last key word. Please use a 12 pt Times New Roman font for the abstract (see the 37th WNC Abstract Template). The abstract must contain comprehensive information and have the following sections:

    The board space available for each poster is 1 m wide and 1.2 m high. All posters should be mounted on the boards by 8:00 AM, September 21. Posters will be available for public viewing throughout the conference, and graduate students are expected to be present from 4:45 to 6:30 pm Wednesday, September 21, during which time judges will visit the posters. Winners will be announced at the conference banquet, and cash awards will be presented to first ($500), second ($300), and third ($200) place winners.


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  • Jul
    08
    Do we really know how smart animals are?


    Have humans been getting it all wrong when it comes to testing animal intelligence? In an ABC Radio National article, a world-renowned biologist and primatologist says we should judge an animal’s intelligence by testing the limits of its natural behaviours, and not by comparing it to our own standards.

    Read more in this article.

    Photo: https://www.nih.gov/news-events/news-releases/nih-reduce-significantly-use-chimpanzees-research 


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  • Jul
    07
    New summary from July Animal Frontiers


    AnimalFrontiersJuly2016cover
    By Lucy Schroeder

    American Society of Animal Science Communications Intern

    For over sixty years, it has been known that treating livestock with low doses of antibiotics can increase growth rate. In recent years, using antibiotics in this way has become a controversial topic, with critics concerned about the effect it may have on the development of antibiotic-resistant bacteria important in human medicine. As a result, it is important to understand how the microbiota play a role in digestion so we better understand how to achieve efficient weight gain in livestock.

    Dr. Laura M. Cox of Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Harvard Medical School examined the effects of antibiotic use on gut microbes and weight gain in different species. She has observed that the effectiveness of low-dose antibiotic use in animals can be influenced by what age the animal receives the treatment, the variety of the animal’s diet, and the length of the animal’s growth cycle.


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  • Jul
    07
    West Texas A&M research in the spotlight


    July 7, 2016 – Scientists at West Texas A&M University (WTAMU) recently announced initial results of research involving cloned cattle and efforts to improve both beef carcass quality and yield simultaneously.

    The following message from Texas A&M University System Chancellor John Sharp summarizes what the findings mean to the beef industry.

    …  our scientists are announcing the initial results of their research involving cloned cattle and efforts to create a herd of cattle that consistently produces the highest quality beef, and more of it per animal.


    About five years ago, one of our WTAMU faculty members spotted two “one-in-a-million” beef carcasses in a packing plant. This gave him an idea, so he bought them and brought them back to his research partners. From the steer carcass, they cloned bulls. From a heifer carcass, they cloned cows. They bred those clones, and last month, for the first time, they harvested seven of the offspring. Industry-wide, fewer than one in 20 carcasses grades Prime, but with these cattle – which may be a whole new breed – WTAMU is currently producing Prime beef at a rate of one in seven! 
    There is more research to be done, but WTAMU researchers have demonstrated that they have a way to revolutionize the beef industry. 


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  • Jul
    07
    2016 JAM Program online


    July 7, 2016 – Conference information and the scientific program for the 2016 Joint Annual Meeting are at your fingertips in the JAM Program.

    The program has everything you need to plan your time in Salt Lake City, including:

    General meeting information, a transportation schedule, sightseeing options, hotel information, special events, pre- and post-conference events, an exhibit directory, maps, meeting and award sponsors, oral and poster scientific sessions, and more.

    While you’re at JAM, keep up-to-date with the 2016 JAM app! Create a personalized schedule, browse abstracts, view maps of the meeting locations, receive special announcement notifications, and more!


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  • Jul
    07
    Next beef cattle nutrient requirements webinar is July 11


    July 7, 2016 – The fifth and final ASAS webinar about the Nutrient Requirements of Beef Cattle: Eighth Revised Edition (2016) has been scheduled for Mon., July 11 at noon (CDT). Registration is free!

    Guest speakers include Dr. Karen Beauchemin, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Lethbridge, Alberta; Dr. Andy Cole, Agricultural Research Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture (Retired); and Dr. Galen Erickson, University of Nebraska, Lincoln. They will discuss revisions relating to environmental issues, and byproducts and feed composition. All three of our guest speakers served on the National Academy of Sciences’ Committee on Nutrient Requirements of Beef Cattle.

    To register, click here. After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar.

    Access recordings of the previous webinars here.


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  • Jun
    30
    Next Nutrient Requirements of Beef Cattle webinar is July 7


    June 30, 2016 – The fourth in a series of ASAS webinars about the Nutrient Requirements of Beef Cattle: Eighth Revised Edition (2016) has been scheduled for Thurs., July 7 at noon (CDT). Registration is free!

    Guest speaker Dr. Luis Tedeschi will discuss the development and evaluation of the mathematical model. Dr. Tedeschi is professor
 in the Department of Animal Science at Texas A&M University in 
College Station. He served on the National Academy of Sciences’ Committee on Nutrient Requirements of Beef Cattle.

    To register, click here. After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar.

    Access recordings of the first three “beef” webinars here.


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  • Jun
    30
    Stay connected at JAM


    June 30, 2016 – Social media is a very powerful tool that will be employed to increase the reach of the Joint Annual Meeting (JAM) and engage attendees. We will be publicizing JAM updates, events, and personalities across multiple social media platforms: Twitter, Instagram, and Facebook. In addition, the JAM App will also be used to share information.

    Twitter’s strength lies in it being the ultimate real-time tool. We will use Twitter to broadcast quick updates and reminders throughout JAM.



    Use the Twitter logo or QR code at right to be directed automatically to the 2016jointannualmeeting Twitter account.


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  • Jun
    30
    ASAS announces new JASEdit service


    June 30, 2016 – In order to provide enhanced services to our members and to individuals who submit to the Journal of Animal Science, the American Society of Animal Science (ASAS) is announcing a new service called JASEdit. The service will provide three levels of review for authors and can be accessed pre- or post-submission to JAS.

    The three levels include:

    The service launches on July 1, 2016. Pricing and details can be found at https://mc.manuscriptcentral.com/jasedit.


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  • Jun
    30
    Strategic Plan focus groups at 2016 JAM


    June 30, 2016 – The American Society of Animal Science (ASAS) launched its last major Strategic Plan in 2008. The plan has been wildly successful, and now it is time to build upon that in the next Strategic Plan. The only way for a strategic plan to be successful is to have member involvement in its creation and execution, and consequently, we are holding a number of focus groups at the 2016 JAM in Salt Lake City.

    Please fill out this web form if you are willing to participate in focus groups. After you let us know that you are willing to participate, ASAS staff will contact you directly to schedule the best group and time for your participation. Focus groups will only take an hour, but they go a long way toward helping ASAS incorporate membership feedback into our Strategic Plan.

    Please submit your name and your ASAS sectional affiliation. If you are not associated with a section, just list your country of residence.

    Thanks again and we look forward to speaking with you.


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  • Jun
    30
    JAM launches Instagram account


    June 30, 2016 – The Joint Annual Meeting (JAM) is increasing its social media presence with the launch of an Instagram account instagram.com/2016jointannualmeeing/, hashtag #2016jam.



    The debut, set for Tuesday, July 19, will coincide with a challenge to those attending the JAM Opening BBQ to post their cutest, silliest pictures using the hashtag #2016jambbq. The Instagrammer whose picture receives the most likes will win a gift bag containing great American Society of Animal Science (ASAS) swag. Voting will end Thursday, July 21 at 6:00 pm. The winner will be announced the following day at the ASAS Business Meeting from 9:30 to 10:30 am.

    Follow the 2016 JAM Instagram account for updates throughout the meeting and to share your pictures.


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